Number of teenagers sent to hospital because of allergies has shot up by 65%

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Number of teenagers sent to hospital because of allergies has shot up by 65% in five years, NHS figures show Some 4,743 teenagers given treatment in 2017/19 compared to 2,873 in 2013/14 Experts believe hyper-cleanliness may be making kids' immune systems weaker Also a 41 per cent spike in youngsters who were treated for anaphylactic shock

By Connor Boyd Health Reporter For Mailonline

Published: 14:53 GMT, 1 November 2019 | Updated: 14:57 GMT, 1 November 2019

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The number of children hospitalised with allergies has soared by two thirds in the past five years, alarming figures show.

NHS data revealed 4,743 teenagers were given treatment in 2017/19 compared with 2,873 in 2013/14.

Experts believe hyper-cleanliness in modern society may be making children's immune systems weaker.

Figures showed there was also a 41 per cent spike in youngsters who were treated for anaphylactic shock in the same time.

Karanbir, 13, known as Karan, was killed after cheese was thrown at him during break time at William Perkin Church of England High School in Greenford, West London

Karanbir, 13, known as Karan, was killed after cheese was thrown at him during break time at William Perkin Church of England High School in Greenford, West London 

The number of children hospitalised with allergies has soared by 65 per cent in the past five years (file image)

The number of children hospitalised with allergies has soared by 65 per cent in the past five years (file image)

The deadly reaction is an overreaction by the immune system which causes the swelling of the throat, difficulty breathing and loss of consciousness.

For teenagers, there were a third more cases of anaphylactic shock while for those 19 and over, there was a 10 per cent jump, the BBC reported.

Allergies occur when the immune system mistakenly identifies food as a threat and launches a protective response against it.

Symptoms can include sneezing, itchy eyes, wheezing, hives, swelling, and even vomiting and diarrhoea.

Food allergies affect about 7 per cent of children in the UK, according to Kings College London.

Amena Warner, head of clinical services at Allergy UK, said teenagers may be more likely to need treatment than younger children because they start to become independent.

She claimed this means they might not question food the same way as parents

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