Hand dryers won't kill the coronavirus: World Health Organization debunk 10 of ...

Hand dryers and UV lamps won't kill the coronavirus, the World Health Organization has said.

Debunking 10 of the biggest myths surrounding the outbreak, the board of top health officials also said eating garlic will not protect you.

While some bogus 'cures' aren't harmful, others are potentially dangerous, like drinking bleach or dousing the body with alcohol spray.

Rumours spread fast on social media, and authorities have tried clamping down on perpetrators.

It comes after a British expert warned that the spread of misinformation and conspiracy theories could fuel more cases.

Professor Paul Hunter, of the University of East Anglia's (UEA) Norwich Medical School, said fake news leads to bad advice and people taking 'greater risks' during health crises. 

Today the death toll hit 1,363. More than 64,000 cases have been diagnosed around the world. 

The best way to protect against COVID-19 is to wash and dry your hands thoroughly

Ultraviolet lamps, which pump UV rays into the skin, will not sterilise the skin. They could, however, cause skin irritation, the WHO warned

Hand dryers, UV lamps won't kill the coronavirus, the World Health Organization has said

The WHO revealed the following myths: 

1. Hand dryers will not kill the coronavirus   

Hand dryers alone cannot kill coronavirus bacteria. 

Rumours have claimed using the hot air from the dryer for 30 seconds will rid any trace of the virus on your hands, China Daily report. 

Above all, people should focus on keeping their hands clean. 

'To protect yourself against the new coronavirus, you should frequently clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water,' the WHO said.

'Once your hands are cleaned, you should dry them thoroughly by using paper towels or a warm air dryer.'

2. Ultraviolet lamps cannot sterilise the skin

Ultraviolet lamps, which pump UV rays into the skin, will not sterilise the skin.

They could, however, cause skin irritation, the WHO warned. 

3. Eating garlic is not protective

Garlic is a healthy food that may have some antimicrobial properties, the WHO said.

However, there is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus. 

An online post went viral after claiming a bowl of boiled garlic water can cure the 2019 novel coronavirus.

Facebook has since blocked the post because 'the primary claims in the information are factually inaccurate.' 

4. Sesame oil doesn't block coronavirus from entering the body

Sesame oil is a staple in Asian cooking. But that's about all it's good for. 

Contrary to rife rumours, rubbing sesame oil onto the skin won't block coronavirus from entering the body.

The WHO said, 'No. Sesame oil does not kill the new coronavirus.' 

This is because transmission is believed to occur when an infected person sneezes, and droplets land in a person's mouth or nose, or they inhale it from the air.

Close contact with someone infected also raises the risk. According to the Centre of Disease Control and Prevention, spread from person-to-person can happen from six feet apart. 

5. Spraying alcohol or chlorine over your body will not get rid of the virus

Once COVID-19 is in your system, spraying substances like alcohol and chlorine on the skin will not be of any use.

It’s currently unclear if a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes.

But generally, there are some powerful chemical disinfectants that can kill coronaviruses on surfaces, according to the WHO. These include bleach and chlorine-based disinfectants. 

They should not to be used on the skin, as this can be dangerous. It is also not recommended to sniff it. 

They could be harmful to mucous membranes - the tissue lining the mouth, eyes and organs.

The WHO said: 'Be aware that both alcohol and chlorine can be useful to disinfect surfaces, but they need to be used under appropriate recommendations.'

6. Thermal scanners won't always detect infected people

Thermal scanners are being used worldwide at airports and railway stations. They can detect people with a fever - a temperature higher than normal.

'However, they cannot detect people who are infected but are not yet sick with fever,' the WHO said.

It takes two to ten days before people who are infected become sick and develop a fever. In some people, it's taken 14 days. 

Travellers, therefore, may not be picked up by screening methods. It means they can unknowingly go on to transfer COVID-19 to other people without showing symptoms. 

There is no evidence from the current outbreak that eating garlic has protected people from the new coronavirus

Contrary to rife rumours, rubbing sesame oil onto the skin won't block coronavirus from entering the body

Debunking 10 of the biggest myths surrounding the outbreak, the WHO also said eating garlic and rubbing your skin with sesame oil will not protect you from COVID-19

7. Letters or packages from China do not carry coronavirus

It is safe to receive packages from China, the WHO said. Analysis shows coronaviruses do not survive very long on objects - especially flying between countries.

As the world faced the early days of the outbreak, people questioned exactly how COVID-19 spreads, and if it can arrive by mail.

There is nothing to suggest this is the case.

8. Pets can't get ill with coronavirus 

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COVID-19 is understood to have transferred to humans from an animal at a food market in Wuhan.

However, at present, there is no evidence that pets can be infected by coronavirus. 

NO EVIDENCE DETTOL CAN KILL COVID-19 

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