Where's REALLY had the most Covid-19 deaths? Study says Belgium but data ...

A US study of 19 countries found Belgium has had the highest death toll per 100,000 people. It was followed by Spain, the UK and US

A US study of 19 countries found Belgium has had the highest death toll per 100,000 people. It was followed by Spain, the UK and US

Belgium has suffered the most coronavirus deaths for the size of its population - while the UK and US are third and fourth, according to a study.

Researchers analysed data from 19 countries with more than five million citizens and compared how many Covid-19 victims there has been for every 100,000 people living there up until September 19.

It revealed Belgium had the worst mortality rate (86.8), followed by Spain (65), the UK (62.6) and the US (60.3). For comparison, South Korea's stood at just 0.7 - 85 times smaller than that of Britain or America. 

But when statistics for every country in the world is taken into account, Belgium falls to being the third worst-hit nation. The tiny European state of San Marino claims the grim accolade, followed by Peru and then Belgium. 

San Marino, a mountainous state surrounded by , has only seen 42 Covid-19 deaths since February. But this equates to a rate of 123 per 100,000 residents when its tiny population of 33,800 is taken into account. Peru - which is home to 32million people - actually has a rate of 101 deaths per 100,000. 

Our World in Data, a website that publishes figures on large global problems using official sources, reveals the UK is 11th and the US 12th, with Andorra, Ecuador, and Mexico higher. 

India, on the other hand, has had the third highest cumulative deaths in the world, with 112,161. But due to its huge population, it places 87th in deaths per population. 

The US study, published in a medical journal, was designed to work out how many excess deaths there had been in America compared with 18 other countries.

All countries analysed were chosen because they had more than five million citizens and a GDP of at least $25,000 (£19,300) per capita, the researchers explain in their paper published in JAMA.

It showed the pandemic has directly or indirectly led to 225,000 deaths in the US, whether those people died of Covid-19 itself or an issue linked to the pandemic, such as delayed medical care over fears of going to hospitals amid outbreaks of the disease.

Looking at all the countries in the world, Belgium is actually not the worst-hit nation. San Marino is followed by Peru and then Belgium

Looking at all the countries in the world, Belgium is actually not the worst-hit nation. San Marino is followed by Peru and then Belgium

Researchers at University of Pennsylvania showed 150,000 people died of Covid-19 between March and August 1. But an additional 75,000 deaths had occurred beyond what would be expected for that time period. 

The team said as of September 19, the US reported a total of 198,589 Covid-19 deaths - 60.3 deaths per 100 000.

Had it had a death toll comparable to Australia (3.3 deaths per 100 000), the US could have avoided 94 per cent of its deaths (187,661 fewer), the researchers revealed, as they blamed 'weak public health infrastructure and a decentralised, inconsistent US response to the pandemic'.

But the US did not have the highest death toll from March to September, according to the small analysis. It was fourth, following Belgium (86.8), Spain (65) and the UK (62.6).

At the bottom of the table, South Korea and Japan have had less than one death (0.7) per 100,000 people, despite being two of the first countries to report coronavirus cases.

But the study does not paint a full picture because it's only a small analysis of 19 countries.

PICTURED: Of the countries with the largest cumulative death tolls, these are their death rates per million people

PICTURED: Of the countries with the largest cumulative death tolls, these are their death rates per million people  

Our World in Data shows South America has had the highest deaths per million people to date (640), followed by North America (550) and Europe (313). Asia has had just 47 deaths per million people in comparison

Our World in Data shows South America has had the highest deaths per million people to date (640), followed by North America (550) and Europe (313). Asia has had just 47 deaths per million people in comparison

20 COUNTRIES WITH THE WORST DEATHS

The data shows the countries with the highest death toll per 100,000 people, and their cumulative death toll in brackets.

San Marino: 123.7 (42)

Peru: 101.8 (33,577)

Belgium: 88.7 (10,327)

Andorra: 76.3 (59)

Bolivia: 72 (8,407)

Spain: 71.7 (33,553)

Brazil: 71.7 (152,513)

Chile: 70.2 (13,434)

Ecuador: 69.7 (12,306)

Mexico: 66.1 (85,285)

United States: 65.7 (220,889)

United Kingdom: 63.7 (43,293)

: 60.1 (36,372)

Panama: 58.6 (2,529)

Sweden: 58.5 (5,918)

Argentina: 56 (25,342)

Colombia: 55.9 (28,457)

Sint Maarten (Dutch part): 51.3 (22)

France: 50.7 (33,125)

Macedonia: 39.1 (815)

Source: Our World in Data 

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Our World in Data shows that of all the 198 countries in the world, San Marino has had the highest death toll per 100,000 people by far (123.7).

It has only reported 742 confirmed Covid-19 cases since its first on February 27. But due to its small population, it means the coronavirus is highly prevalent, relative to the rest of the world. 

It has had more than 22,000 cases per million people in total - the equivalent of two people in every 100 (two per cent). It's twice the official rate of the UK - which has recorded 9,600 cases per million people, the equivalent of 0.9 people in every 100. 

But experts insist at least 10 per cent of Britain has actually been infected since the virus first landed on UK soil in January. Millions of infected patients were never spotted because of the Government's lacklustre testing regime.

San Marino's estimate of prevalence is also likely to be an underestimate because a huge proportion of infected people are thought to never show any symptoms, meaning they never get swabbed. 

San Marino was declared 'Covid-free' on 26 June although has had several small outbreaks since, and is now recording cases every day once more, albeit it in low numbers. 

The seven-day average has hovered between one and four cases in the past week, according to Our

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