Scientists have developed COVID-19 vaccine that could trigger a 10-times ...

Scientists develop a 'nanoparticle' COVID-19 vaccine that could trigger a 10-times stronger immune response than the reaction seen in survivors and protect against future mutated strains Scientists have developed an experimental vaccine that uses nanoparticles, which mimic the structural features of the coronavirus The body is trained to recognize the receptors the virus uses to enter and infect human cells, and builds up antibodies In mice, the virus produced ten times more neutralizing antibodies than those seen in COVID-19 survivors The jab also produced a strong memory cell response, in which the body remembers the invading virus to produce antibodies if infected in the future In one monkey, the vaccine bound to different parts of the vaccine's spike protein, which could protect against future mutated strains

By Mary Kekatos Senior Health Reporter For Dailymail.com

Published: 22:06 GMT, 2 November 2020 | Updated: 22:06 GMT, 2 November 2020

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Scientists say they have developed an experimental coronavirus vaccine candidate that is far more potent than others currently being investigated.

In trials conducted in mice, the team from the University of Washington School of Medicine said its vaccine triggered a 10-times stronger immune response to the infection than seen in COVID-19 survivors.

What's more, it also provoked a strong memory cell response, in which the body remembers the invading virus to produce antibodies more quickly if infected.

The team says its vaccine does not require freezer storage like those being made by other companies, which makes it easier to produce and ship across the globe.

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A new vaccine developed by UW Medicine produced ten times more neutralizing antibodies than seen in people who survived the infection in mice trials (file image)

The jab also produced a strong memory cell response, in which the body remembers the invading virus to produce antibodies more quickly in a future infection. Pictured: An artist's depiction of the  vaccine candidate in which 60 pieces of a coronavirus protein (red) decorate nanoparticles (blue and white) to get the body to recognize the receptors

The jab also produced a strong memory cell response, in which the body remembers the invading virus to produce antibodies more quickly in a future infection. Pictured: An artist's depiction of the  vaccine candidate in which 60 pieces of a coronavirus protein (red) decorate nanoparticles (blue and white) to get the body to recognize the receptors

'We hope that our nanoparticle

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