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Is there anything a Mediterranean diet can’t cure?

Adopting a Mediterranean diet could help slash the risk of developing dementia, research suggests.

The benefits of eating oily fish, vegetables and nuts have previously been shown to reduce the risk of developing the most deadly form of breast cancer and ADHD, with the latest study showing it to also improves brain health.

Those who stuck to the trendy diet were 35 per cent less likely to perform badly on cognitive tests - an early sign of the disease.

Even after taking into account smoking, exercise and socio-economic status - all believed triggers of dementia, the findings remained true.

The new trial of the high-fat diet, which is notably low on red and processed meat, was based on almost 6,000 people.

Benefits of eating oily fish, vegetables and nuts have long been uncovered, with the latest study showing it to also improve brain health

Benefits of eating oily fish, vegetables and nuts have long been uncovered, with the latest study showing it to also improve brain health

THE BENEFITS OF A MEDITERRANEAN DIET

Previous research by the Maastricht University in the Netherlands found that adopting a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of developing the most deadly form of breast cancer by 40 per cent.

Experts from the University of Barcelona also believe the range of nutrients in the diet makes children less likely to have ADHD.

Cambridge University even found that adopting such a diet would save around 2,000 lives in Britain a year by preventing deaths from heart attacks and stroke.

Researchers from the IRCCS Neuromed Institute in Pozzilli, , even suggest doctors prescribe olive oil, vegetables and nuts before statins to reduce a patient's heart attack risk. 

A sliding scale

Claire McEvoy, study co-author at the University of California, San Francisco, said the benefits of healthy eating seem to exist on a sliding scale.

She said: 'Even moderate adherence to these high-quality dietary patterns showed a protective association with cognitive function.'

Dr Maria Carrillo, chief science officer for the Alzheimer's Association, said the study showed changing your dietary pattern 'really is quite impactful'.

Change your trajectory 

She told Fox Business: 'You can change your trajectory of cognitive decline if you are adherent, for example, to Mediterranean diets or other diets that are low in saturated fats, low in processed flour and processed sugar.

'Good fats are important. Fats found in fish and good meats, as

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