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Jeremy Hunt says computers could replace doctors

Patients may one day be diagnosed by computers, not doctors, according to health secretary Jeremy Hunt.

Mr Hunt said: 'So what might medicine look like when the NHS is 80 [in 2028]? Well, the first thing is we may well not be going to doctors for a diagnosis, we might be going to computers instead'.

Artificial intelligence could help in diagnosing patients by analysing X-rays and samples to determine conditions such as cancer, according to NHS England bosses.

In as little as a decade's time, patients may even be diagnosed with disorders before they develop symptoms as DNA screening is set to become accessible to the masses, Mr Hunt said.

The future will also see patients being able to declare their wishes about sensitive subjects such as organ donation and end-of-life care through apps, Mr Hunt added.

Patients may one day be diagnosed by computers, not doctors, according to Jeremy Hunt

Patients may one day be diagnosed by computers, not doctors, according to Jeremy Hunt

ROBOTS COULD SOON CARE FOR DEMENTIA PATIENTS 

Robots could soon be caring for dementia patients, a Lancet Commission report suggested in July.

Technological advancements mean gadgets and apps are already being introduced into dementia care.

Devices like GPS trackers are used to ensure patients do not get lost, while monitors in the home can detect falls and tell if the phone or television is being used, which then sends this information back to family and carers.

Some dementia patients wear smartwatches, which collect data on their sleep and eating patterns, blood pressure and sugar levels for analysis by doctors, researchers and carers. 

And interactive technology, including , and specialised apps and computer games, have been introduced to care homes to help calm patients with dementia.

Electronic calendars and speaking reminders can also help patients tell the time or remind them to do simple tasks such as washing their hands.

'We may well not be going to doctors for a diagnosis' 

Speaking at the NHS Expo conference in Manchester, Mr Hunt said: 'The changes in medical innovation are likely to transform humanity by as much in the next 25 years as the internet has in the last 25 years.

'So what might medicine look like when the NHS is 80 [in 2028]? Well, the first thing is we may well not be going to doctors for a diagnosis, we might be going to computers instead, who will be looking at the 300,000 biomarkers in every single

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