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NFL player who died last week to be tested for CTE

The brain of former NFL football player Drew Wahlroos, who killed himself earlier this month, has been donated to Boston University.

Wahlroos died at the age of 37 from a self-inflicted gun wound to the chest on September 2.

According to the San Diego County Medical Examiner's Office, experts suspect he may have suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a football-linked brain injury which can cause depression, dementia and suicidal thoughts.

On Tuesday it emerged that his brain will go to the research team at Boston, who have conducted extensive studies on traumatic brain injuries in football players. 

Possible CTE: Drew Wahlroos, 37, died of a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest on September 2

Possible CTE: Drew Wahlroos, 37, died of a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest on September 2

Wahlroos grew up in Poway, California, and played linebacker for Colorado from 1999 to 2002. He had a 21-game stint with the St Louis Rams. His brain will be donated to Boston University

Wahlroos grew up in Poway, California, and played linebacker for Colorado from 1999 to 2002. He had a 21-game stint with the St Louis Rams. His brain will be donated to Boston University

Last month, Boston's team, led by Dr Robert Stern, sent shockwaves throughout the industry by publishing a study which found that 99 percent of players who donated their brains for research had traces of CTE.

The disease has been linked to suicidal behavior.

Wahlroos grew up in Poway, California, and played linebacker for Colorado from 1999 to 2002. He had a 21-game stint with the St Louis Rams.

WHAT IS CTE? 

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a degenerative brain disease that is caused by repeated hits to the head. 

Over time, these hard impacts result in confusion, depression and eventually dementia.

There has been several retired football players who have come forward with brain diseases.

They are attributing their condition to playing football and the hits they took. 

More than 1,800 former athletes and military veterans have pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation for CTE research.

CTE was usually associated with boxing before former NFL players began revealing their conditions.  

He is hardly the first professional player to have taken his own life due to suspected CTE. 

Boston University is also examining the brains of Aaron Hernandez, the jailed Patriots star who committed suicide in his cell earlier this year, and Junior Seau, the Patriots linebacker who killed himself with a self-inflicted gunshot to the chest in 2012. 

More than 1,800 former athletes and military veterans have pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation for CTE research.

Retired NFL stars Leonard Marshall and Matt Hasselbeck announced in May they would be donating their brains to CTE research. 

Marshall, a two-time Super Bowl winner and defensive lineman for the , said the sport has left him struggling with short-term memory loss and erratic behavior at age 55.  

The news of Wahlroos' brain joining the study comes amid a surge in controversy surrounding brain injury and contact sports. 

Yesterday, the editors of a major medical journal urged doctors to cut all ties with the sport - from sponsoring NFL teams to treating college players - since it 'is not consonant with the best values of our profession'.

And today, the Canadian Football League announced an

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