Artificial Intelligence could help diagnose COVID-19 using X-RAYS

Artificial Intelligence that can diagnose COVID-19 using X-RAYS could help identify cases of coronavirus more quickly and predict outcomes for patients, computer programmers claim Developers have trained their AI model on publicly available COVID-19 X-rays To get a better picture they need more details and a wider range of X-ray images They believe their invention could help track the progress of the virus in people This would allow them to help doctors create a more effective treatment plan 

By Ryan Morrison For Mailonline

Published: 12:09 BST, 6 April 2020 | Updated: 12:09 BST, 6 April 2020

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An artificial intelligence programme could be used to more quickly predict the outcome of coronavirus patients by studying X-rays of their chest. 

Developers at the Oxford-based data-visualisation company, Zegami, have created a machine learning model that can diagnose the virus from the images.

However, the team say that in order to get better and more detailed results their AI needs to be trained on a wider range of X-ray images from infected patients.  

The team believe it could have an artificial intelligence system in place within a matter of weeks to study the disease if it gets enough X-ray images. 

An artificial intelligence programme could be used to more quickly predict the outcome of coronavirus patients by studying X-rays of their chest

An artificial intelligence programme could be used to more quickly predict the outcome of coronavirus patients by studying X-rays of their chest

Zegami CEO, Roger Noble, has written an open letter to the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust asking for more images to train the AI model.    

According to the company, the new program could not only help spot and identify COVID-19 cases more easily from other lung conditions but could also help predict potential outcomes for patients.

It would be able to do this by comparing their COVID-19 lung X-rays with other previous patients in similar situations.

The team believe their invention could help provide doctors with a better idea of how the disease will progress in a patient.

This could in turn lead to the development of a more effective treatment for the virus.

Zegami launched out of Oxford University in 2016 to enable researchers and companies to explore large image datasets using machine learning models.

Noble said: 'COVID-19 is a huge challenge, and technology should play a key role in defeating it.' 

In developing its new platform, Zegami used publicly available images of

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