Japanese honeybees defend themselves from 'murder hornets' by COOKING the ...

There is a war going on in nature – murderous Asian hornets are invading honeybee hives, and are decapitating the insects and feeding the bodies to their young.

However, Japanese honeybees have developed a counter attack that cooks the predators to death.

Called 'hot defensive bee balls,' more than 500 workers bees surround the hornets and vibrate their muscles to produce heat up to 116 Fahrenheit -scorching the hornets within an hour.

The giant hornets, which are more than double the size of honeybees and have a wingspan over three inches, are native to East Asia, but are slowly occupying other parts of the world.

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There is a war going on in nature – murderous Asian hornets are invading honeybee hives, and are decapitating the insects and feeding the bodies to their young. However, Japanese honeybees have developed a counter attack that cooks the predators to death.

There is a war going on in nature – murderous Asian hornets are invading honeybee hives, and are decapitating the insects and feeding the bodies to their young. However, Japanese honeybees have developed a counter attack that cooks the predators to death.

'Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals,' researchers wrote in a study published in PLOS ONE.

'The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown.'

'Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet.'

The honeybees have developed the tactic of surrounding the invading hornets and killing them with heat.

In the fall months, giant Asian hornets attack Japanese honeybee colonies to steal larvae and pupae to feed on.

Called 'hot defensive bee balls,' more than 500 workers bees surround the hornets and vibrate their muscles to produce heat up to 116 Fahrenheit -scorching the hornets within an hour

Called 'hot defensive bee balls,' more than 500 workers bees surround the hornets and vibrate their muscles to produce heat up to 116 Fahrenheit -scorching the hornets within an hour

In the fall months, giant Asian hornets attack Japanese honeybee colonies to steal larvae and pupae to feed on. However, the bees come together in a spherical formation called 'hot defensive bee ball,' which traps the hornets inside

In the fall months, giant Asian hornets attack Japanese honeybee colonies to steal larvae and pupae to feed on. However, the bees come together in a spherical formation called 'hot defensive bee ball,' which traps the hornets inside

However, researchers have now discovered that more than 500 worker honeybees gather in a large group to fight back.

They come together in a spherical formation called 'hot defensive bee ball,' which traps the hornets

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