Stellar explosions created calcium found in our teeth and bones

Rare stellar explosions created half of the calcium in the universe including the minerals that make up our bones and teeth, study reveals Researchers say calcium rich supernova produced half the universe's calcium  These rare stellar events also created the nutrient in our bones and teeth Recently, astronomers observed SN 2019ehk 55 million light years from Earth The team says this supernova emitted the most calcium ever observed

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 20:32 BST, 5 August 2020 | Updated: 21:04 BST, 5 August 2020

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Rare stellar explosions produced half the calcium in the universe, including what is in our teeth and bones, according to a new study.

The unique bursts, called 'calcium-rich supernovae,' remained elusive among the scientific world, but a recent examination provided the first glimpse into its last month of life and detonation.

Although calcium comes from stars, calcium-rich supernovae produce massive amounts of the nutrient all living things need to survive in just seconds.

Researchers have recently located SN 2019ehk, 55 million light years from Earth, which emitted the most calcium ever observed in a singular astrophysical event. 

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Rare stellar explosions produced half the calcium in the universe, including what is in our teeth and bones The unique bursts are called 'calcium-rich supernovae' (artist impression)

Rare stellar explosions produced half the calcium in the universe, including what is in our teeth and bones The unique bursts are called 'calcium-rich supernovae' (artist impression)

Wynn Jacobson-Galan, a first-year Northwestern graduate student who led the study, said: 'These events are so few in number that we have never known what produced calcium-rich supernova.'

'By observing what this star did in its final month before it reached its critical, tumultuous end, we peered into a place previously unexplored, opening new avenues of study within transient science.'

SN2019K was spotted by Joel Shepherd while observing the spiral galaxy Messier 100, located 55 million light years from our planet.

The bright burst appeared in the frame as an orange dot, leading him to report the anomaly to a community astronomical survey.

Researchers have recently located SN 2019 ehk, 55 million light years from Earth, which emitted the most calcium ever observed in a singular astrophysical event. Pictured is an image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope

Researchers have recently located SN 2019 ehk, 55 million light years from Earth, which emitted the most calcium ever observed in a singular astrophysical event. Pictured is an image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope

'As soon as the world knew that there was a potential supernova in M100, a global collaboration was ignited,' Jacobson-Galan said.

'Every single country with a prominent telescope turned to look at this object.'

Stars produce calcium, but only a small amount is created when it

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