Archaeology: Hillfort dating back up to 3,000 years discovered near the top of ...

Ancient hillfort 'built by the mysterious Votadini tribe' and dating back up to 3,000 years is discovered near the top of Arthur's Seat by archaeologists Excavation is taking place atop the extinct volcano that overlooks Edinburgh Work began in March 2020, but was halted due to the coronavirus pandemic The settlement features thick stone walls and evidence of farming activity The Votadini people that built the fort were later subsumed by Roman culture

By Ian Randall For Mailonline

Published: 14:00 BST, 7 September 2020 | Updated: 14:23 BST, 7 September 2020

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Archaeologists working on top of Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh have uncovered the remains of an ancient hillfort thought to date back up to 3,000 years ago.

The prehistoric walls atop the extinct volcano were built by the Votadini — an Iron-Age Celtic tribe who once lived in southeast Scotland and northeast England.

The Votadini were also responsible for the burial site at Traprain Law in East Lothian — which was also thought to have been their capital.

Finds from Traprain Law — which include Roman coins from the continent — suggest the Votadini were ultimately Romanized and assimilated into early Scottish culture. 

Archaeologists working on top of Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh have uncovered the remains of an ancient hillfort, pictured, thought to date back up to 3,000 years ago

Archaeologists working on top of Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh have uncovered the remains of an ancient hillfort, pictured, thought to date back up to 3,000 years ago

The excavation work on Arthur's seat's north face — which presently comprises three trenches — is being conducted by CFA Archaeology in collaboration with Historic Environment Scotland.

'More results from Arthur's Seat! The wall line of what we think is the fort's rampart is still surviving despite erosion,' CFA Archaeology tweeted last week. 

'Hard work to get our tools up the hill, but worth it for the view!' they added.

Previous digs on the 820 feet (250 metre) high summit had revealed 18 feet (5.4 metres) -thick stone walls, reaching around 4 feet (1.2 metres) tall, that blocked off one side of the peak — while shear cliffs protected the other.

Archaeologists have also discovered evidence that the Votadini used part of the land within the hilltop settlement for farming — and

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