People who can afford exciting experiences believe they have lived longer, ...

Studies have shown that wealthy people live longer, but new research suggests it may be their novel experiences that makes them believe they do.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ‘time codes’ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring – making it seem we have been on the Earth longer.

On the other hand, their work also shows that the brain typically does not stamp events that are mundane or constantly repeated, leaving us less to look back on.

Researchers suggest that when you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ‘feels longer in retrospect.’

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ¿time codes¿ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring ¿ making it seem we have been on the Earth longer. When you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ¿feels longer in retrospect'

The team found that enjoyable experiences, such as vacations and hobbies, create ‘time codes’ in the brain that are more memorable and are easier to recall than events that are boring – making it seem we have been on the Earth longer. When you recall on a memory where you whisked away to a tropical island or spent an afternoon tinkering on a vintage car, life ‘feels longer in retrospect'

Valtteri Arstila, a professor of philosophy at the University of Helsinki, told National Geographic: ‘I think like the main thing is that wealthy people have the option of getting rid of their daily routines.’

Researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems found the area of the brain that creates these time codes is located in the medial entorhinal cortex.

They conducted experiments with two groups of rats while monitor this region.

In one experiment, a rat was introduced to a wide range of experiences and options for action.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

A team at the Norwegian University of Science and Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience discovered a network of brain cells that expresses our sense of time within experiences and memories.

It was free to run around, investigate and chase bits of chocolate while visiting a series of open space environments.

PhD candidate Jørgen Sugar

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