Dead Russian satellite and discarded Chinese rocket are at 'very high risk' of ...

Dead Russian satellite and discarded Chinese rocket are at 'very high risk' of colliding in orbit this week and could release thousands of new space junk pieces A defunct Russian rocket and dead Chinese rocket are floating in orbit The two appear to be on separate paths that could meet Thursday evening  Experts are concerned that the impact could add up to 20% more space debris  The space junk also pose a threat to functioning satellites currently in orbit 

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 00:20 BST, 15 October 2020 | Updated: 00:35 BST, 15 October 2020

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An out of commission Russian satellite and discarded Chinese rocket floating in orbit more than 600 miles above Earth’s surface have a ‘very high risk’ of colliding Thursday evening.

LeoLabs, a firm that tracks space debris, reveals these objects will pass less than 82 feet apart and shared a model that shows a 20 percent chance of the two smashing into each other.

The objects have a mass of 2.8 metric tons and the impact would add thousands of more pieces of space junk into orbit - anywhere from 10 percent to 20 percent more debris.

Although there is no threat on Earth, the added man-made materials pose a significant risk to functioning satellites in orbit.

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An out of commission Russian satellite and discarded Chinese rocket floating in orbit more than 600 miles above Earth¿s surface are ¿very high risk¿ of colliding

An out of commission Russian satellite and discarded Chinese rocket floating in orbit more than 600 miles above Earth’s surface are ‘very high risk’ of colliding

LeoLabs, based in California, shared a model on Twitter announcing the possible collision that is set to occur Thursday.

‘This event continues to be very high risk and will likely stay this way through the time of closest approach,’ the firm shared in the tweet.

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell weighed in on the event with a model prediction.

The image shows the Russian Kosmos-2004 moving towards the southern poles above Earth and the Chinese Chang Zheng 4C is heading north over the Falklands.

LeoLabs , a firm that tracks space debris, reveals these objects will pass less than 82 feet apart and shared a model that shows a 20 percent chance of the two smashing into each other

LeoLabs , a firm that tracks space debris, reveals these objects will pass less than 82 feet apart and shared a model that shows a 20 percent chance of the two smashing into each other

The predicts paths suggest the two could eventually meet head on.

McDowell also notes that the two breaking apart during impact will add 10 to 20 percent more space junk into orbit. 

A report released in May shows Russia is responsible for a majority of the pieces floating around in orbit with some 14,403 pieces.

As Russia has contributed the most in the past two years, but the country has recently dumped 65 more pieces into orbit.

A rocket used to launch a scientific satellite into space has broken apart after nine years in orbit broke apart earlier this month and left dozens of pieces of debris around Earth.

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell weighed in on the event with a model prediction. The image shows the Russian Kosmos-2004 moving towards the southern poles above Earth and the Chinese Chang Zheng 4C is heading north over the Falklands

Astronomer Jonathan McDowell weighed in on the event with a model prediction. The image shows the Russian Kosmos-2004 moving towards the southern poles above Earth and the Chinese Chang Zheng 4C is heading north over the Falklands

An experts notes that the two breaking apart during impact will add 10 to 20 percent more space junk into orbit These pieces can destroy satellites, telescopes, spacecraft

An experts notes that the two breaking apart during impact will add 10

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