Wednesday 18 May 2022 04:19 PM Just friends? Women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex ... trends now

Wednesday 18 May 2022 04:19 PM Just friends? Women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex ... trends now
Wednesday 18 May 2022 04:19 PM Just friends? Women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex ... trends now

Wednesday 18 May 2022 04:19 PM Just friends? Women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex ... trends now

Just friends? Women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex friends, study reveals Participants read scenarios involving their spouse meeting a new friend The friend was either attractive or unattractive, and male or female Feelings of jealousy were higher when the spouse's friend was the opposite sex Women reported higher levels of jealously overall than men

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From Harry Potter to My Best Friend's Wedding, many blockbuster films feature friendships between men and women.

Now, a new study has shed light on the 'green-eyed monster' when it comes to these friendships.

Researchers from the University of Texas in Austin claim that women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex friends.

From Harry Potter to My Best Friend's Wedding (pictured), many blockbuster films feature friendships between men and women

From Harry Potter to My Best Friend's Wedding (pictured), many blockbuster films feature friendships between men and women

Researchers from the University of Texas in Austin claim that women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex friends

Researchers from the University of Texas in Austin claim that women are more jealous than men of their spouse's opposite-sex friends

Did we evolve to be jealous? 

Researchers from the University of California recently pinpointed jealousy in the brain of monkeys, and claimed we inherited the trait to help protect our most valuable resources.

The researchers found two key areas of the brain are stimulated by jealous feelings - the cingulate cortex and lateral septum - which are geared toward maintaining a bond in the face of external challenge. 

The team found feeling jealous could actually be an evolutionary advantage, and we may have inherited it from our ancestors because it helps us protect resources such as our homes and children. 

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While previous studies have focused on sex differences in jealousy, the researchers set out to assess whether men and women differ when it comes to jealousy of their spouse's opposite-sex friends.

In their study, published in Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, the researchers, led by Alyssa Sucrese, wrote: 'Past research in evolutionary psychology has proposed, and found evidence of, sex differences in the adaptive functions of jealousy.

'However, no research has focused specifically on the output of jealousy adaptations in the context of a spouse's apparently platonic extramarital friendship.'

A group of 364 participants were recruited for the study, all of whom were married and at least 18 years old.

The participants were randomly assigned into one of four groups, in which they read different scenarios involving their spouse meeting a new friend of varying sex and attractiveness.

They were asked to judge whether they felt any jealousy in the scenario, and to

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