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Border Patrol tests camera-toting balloon

The U.S. Border Patrol is considering another type of surveillance balloon that can be quickly moved to spot illegal activity, part of an effort to see if more eyes in the sky translate to fewer illegal crossings.

Agents in Texas recently finished a 30-day trial of the camera-toting, helium-filled balloon made by Drone Aviation Holding Corp., a small startup that named former Border Patrol chief David Aguilar to its board of directors in January. 

The 3-year-old, money-losing company gave Aguilar options that may prove lucrative if it gets more orders for its proprietary model.

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The tethered balloon, called Winch Aerostat Small Platform, or WASP. Agents in Texas recently finished a 30-day trial of the camera-toting, helium-filled balloon

The tethered balloon, called Winch Aerostat Small Platform, or WASP. Agents in Texas recently finished a 30-day trial of the camera-toting, helium-filled balloon

The trial comes as agents test hand-launched drones, which are relatively inexpensive but hampered by short battery life and weight limits. 

The Border Patrol has also used six large tethered balloons in Texas since 2012, acquired from the Defense Department.

President Donald has pledged to add 5,000 agents, but hiring has been slow. If drones and balloons are deployed more widely, fewer agents may be needed.

The new balloon - called Winch Aerostat Small Platform, or WASP - drew the Border Patrol's interest largely to save money. 

The company says one costs $800,000 plus about $350,000 a year to operate, depending on how often it's moved. 

By contrast, operating the current fleet of six large balloons costs $33 million a year, according to U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar, a Texas Democrat.

The Border Patrol, in response to questions from The Associated Press, said Thursday it was evaluating results of the trial. 

The agency hadn't previously disclosed the trial, but the AP learned details from Aguilar, Cuellar and head of the agents' union Brandon Judd.

Agents began experimenting with the WASP Aug. 21 at the Border Patrol's Rio Grande City station and with a mobile response team in Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for illegal crossings.

Cuellar, who was briefed on the trial during a visit last month, said the agency's top official in the region was 'very complimentary' of the technology.

HOW THEY WORK 

The new balloon is called Winch Aerostat Small Platform, or WASP.

The balloons can be assembled and deployed by two or three agents in less than an hour and remain aloft while tethered to a moving vehicle. 

The larger balloons being used , controlled remotely from trailers, can take days to assemble, require more than twice the crew and are almost never moved.

Drone Aviation says it can handle gusts up to 45 mph (72 kph). 

The firm behind it says: 'The WASP is a highly tactical and mobile aerostat system which can be operated by as few as two soldiers and can provide day/night video and wireless communication range extension from either a fixed, stationary position or while being towed. 

The Winch Aerostat Small Platform, or WASP. The U.S. The U.S. Border Patrol is considering another type of surveillance balloon to spot illegal activity. It's part of an effort to see if more eyes in the sky translate to fewer illegal border crossings.

The Winch Aerostat Small Platform, or WASP. The U.S. The U.S. Border Patrol is considering another type of surveillance balloon to spot illegal activity. It's part of an effort to see if more eyes in the sky translate to fewer illegal border crossings.

'Over the past four years, U.S. Army-owned WASP systems have successfully completed thousands of hours of soldier training operations, various DoD exercises, and customer operations.

' WASP is currently being utilized by the DoD as a mobile, tactical aerial solution that can support various ISR mission profiles involving ground-based assets as well as aerial assets through communication retransmission.

'Operating at altitudes of up to 1,500 feet AGL with launch sites at 6,000 feet

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