Cathay Pacific fires head of the cabin crew union after support for Hong Kong ...

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Union head at Hong Kong airline Cathay Dragon claimed she has been fired in retaliation for supporting the pro-democracy movement. 

The incident has added to the chill in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory and the spreading 'white terror' in the region. 

Cabin crew union chief Rebecca Sy told a news conference that the Hong Kong airline had dismissed her on Friday without giving a reason, but that the firing came after she was pulled from a flight and asked by an airline representative to confirm that screenshots from Facebook were from her account.

'It's not just about the termination of the job, it's also the whole issue, it's terrifying. All my colleagues are all terrified,' she said. 

'I feel so sorry for them because I'm no longer in that position to protect them.'

Cabin crew union chief Rebecca Sy (pictured) told a news conference that the Hong Kong airline had dismissed her on Friday without giving a reason, but that the firing came after she was pulled from a flight and asked by an airline representative to confirm that screenshots from Facebook were from her account

Cabin crew union chief Rebecca Sy (pictured) told a news conference that the Hong Kong airline had dismissed her on Friday without giving a reason, but that the firing came after she was pulled from a flight and asked by an airline representative to confirm that screenshots from Facebook were from her account

Riot police gather on a street in Hong Kong on Saturday, August 24. Pilots and cabin crew at Hong Kong's flagship carrier have used the term 'white terror' to describe what they see as recent pressure on companies to sack those supporting the pro-democracy movement

Riot police gather on a street in Hong Kong on Saturday, August 24. Pilots and cabin crew at Hong Kong's flagship carrier have used the term 'white terror' to describe what they see as recent pressure on companies to sack those supporting the pro-democracy movement

Police argue with demonstrators through a closed entrance gate at the Kwun Tong MTR station in Hong Kong on Saturday, August 24

Police argue with demonstrators through a closed entrance gate at the Kwun Tong MTR station in Hong Kong on Saturday, August 24 

Cathay Dragon is owned by Hong Kong's main carrier, Cathay Pacific, which has come under pressure from Chinese authorities for employing people who support the protests. 

The company said in a statement that Sy's departure has nothing to do with her union activities.

'Whilst we cannot comment on individual cases, when deciding whether to terminate an employee, we take into account all relevant circumstances including applicable regulatory requirements and the employee's ability to perform his/her job,' the company said. 

The Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions called her firing a 'blatant suppression and retaliation on her participation in the anti-extradition bill movement and her actions to mobilize her colleagues to participate as a trade union leader.'

Sy’s departure follows last week’s shock resignation of Chief Executive Rupert Hogg, the highest-profile corporate casualty of the unrest.  

Pilots and cabin crew at Hong Kong's flagship carrier have used the term 'white terror' to describe what they see as recent pressure on companies to sack those supporting the movement.  

The term is used to describe a climate of fear as people become afraid to voice their political opinions. 

A protester arugues with policemen in Hong Kong's Kowloon Bay on August 24. Cathay Dragon is owned by Hong Kong's main carrier, Cathay Pacific, which has come under pressure from Chinese authorities for employing people who support the protests

A protester arugues with policemen in Hong Kong's Kowloon Bay on August 24. Cathay Dragon is owned by Hong Kong's main carrier, Cathay Pacific, which has come under pressure from Chinese authorities for employing people who support the protests

Protesters march from Kwun Tong to Kowloon Bay in Hong Kong on August 24, in the latest opposition to a planned extradition law that has since morphed into a wider call for democratic rights in the semi-autonomous city

Protesters march from Kwun Tong to Kowloon Bay in Hong Kong on August 24, in the latest opposition to a planned extradition law that has since morphed into a wider call for democratic rights in the semi-autonomous city

Protesters march from Kwun Tong to Kowloon Bay in Hong Kong on August 24, in the latest opposition to a planned extradition law that has since morphed into a wider call for democratic rights in the semi-autonomous city

Protesters march from Kwun Tong to Kowloon Bay in Hong Kong on August 24, in the latest opposition to a planned extradition law that has since morphed into a wider call for democratic rights in the semi-autonomous city

It comes as an employee at the British Consulate in Hong Kong who was detained in mainland China has been released. 

A spokeswoman at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office confirmed the release in a statement to the PA news agency on Saturday.

She said: 'We welcome the release of Simon Cheng and are

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