Girl choked to death on her own blood after breathing in MOULD and developing ...

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A 14-year-old drowned in her own blood after a rare fungal infection caught by breathing in mould spores caused the vessels in her throat to burst.

Jade Owens died just 20 minutes after she began coughing up blood at home after developing the deadly condition known as mucormycosis.

The teenager, a keen horse rider, had weeks before recovered from a bout of severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which had severely weakened her immune system.

Jade's mother Louise believed she had recovered, but her weakened state had made her susceptible to the virus, which had developed in the passageways to her lungs.

The infection slowly progressed into Jade's airways, causing necrosis to set in and the tissue and blood vessels to die, which led to profuse bleeding in her throat.

Jade is treated in hospital

Jade Owens was a keen horse rider

Jade Owens (pictured left, in hospital recovering from a bout of severe diabetic ketoacidosis) drowned in her own blood just weeks later after catching a rare fungal infection

Jade's mother Louise (right, with Jade and her brother Aiden) believed she had recovered from her bout of KDA, but her weakened state had made her susceptible to mucormycosis

Jade's mother Louise (right, with Jade and her brother Aiden) believed she had recovered from her bout of KDA, but her weakened state had made her susceptible to mucormycosis

It is not known where Jade came into contact with the mould spores, but her heartbroken mother now suspects it could have been due to her outdoor hobbies. 

Mother-of-two Louise, 35, from Stockport, Greater Manchester, has now revealed how she ran into her daughter's bedroom to find her coughing up blood.

She added: 'It's something I'll never forget, walking into the room and seeing my daughter covered in blood. It was like a murder scene. 

'She choked on her own blood and had coughed it up. It was horrific to see and that will never leave me. I think about Jade every single day.'

Louise added: 'You never think anything like this will happen to you and I want to make sure no one else goes through what we have. 

'The infection is opportunistic. Jade caught it because her immune system was weaker with diabetes.

'We had no idea she even had diabetes. No one else in the family has it so we had no idea what to look out for.

'If only we knew about the signs then we could have done something. I feel guilty in some ways for that.'

Jade recovering from KDA in hospital

It is not known where Jade came into contact with the mould spores, but her heartbroken mother now suspects it could have been due to her outdoor hobbies

It is not known where Jade came into contact with the mould spores, but her heartbroken mother now suspects it could have been due to her outdoor hobbies (shown right)

For reasons unknown, people with Type 1 diabetes are especially at risk of catching mucormycosis. 

Jade, the eldest of two children, took ill unexpectedly on May 20 this year.

Up to then she had been her happy, normal self, who enjoyed riding horses and spending time enjoying the outdoors with her family.

WHAT IS MUCORMYCOSIS?

Mucormycosis is a rare, fungal infection that occurs after inhaling spores from the air or entering the skin through a cut or scrape. 

These mucor mould organisms can be found in soil, leaves, compost, decaying fruit or vegetables or rotting wood.

The fungus does not always cause ill effects in healthy adults, but can wreak havoc on people with compromised immune systems.

Symptoms first manifest as a sinus infection, fever, and headache. However, if the infection spreads, it can cause tissue loss in the palate, septum, nose, and eye.

If it spreads to the lungs or brain, it can result in seizures, paralysis, pneumonia, and even death. It does not spread between people.

According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders, the infection occurs in 1.7 per 1,000,000 people. 

Early diagnosis and treatment is critical, with treatment usually consisting of anti-fungal medications and surgery.  

Jade had been focused on spending quality time with her family following the tragic death of her father Paul Daniels, in 2016, whose relationship with mother Louise ended in 2007.

She started to complain about having a headache and flu-like symptoms and booked in to see her GP.

Jade, sister to Aiden, 17 and half-sister to Abley Stock, aged one, was prescribed a course of antibiotics as her doctor feared she was suffering with a minor chest infection.

But the next day, on May 21, her grandmother Charleen Owens, a nurse, suggested Jade goes to A&E after displaying rapid breathing and appearing discoloured.

Beautician Louise took Jade to Stepping Hill Hospital in Stockport and a finger-prick test found she was in severe diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).

DKA is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when the body produces too much ketones, effectively turning blood acidic.

It develops when the body can not produce enough insulin and leads to the breakdown of tissue.

DKA can be triggered by an infection and if left untreated can be fatal.

Louise, who has a partner, Neil Stocks, 45, said she had no idea her daughter's shortness of breath and frequent trips to the toilet had anything to

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