Rebecca Long-Bailey vows to 'bring democracy to the economy' as party leader

Rebecca Long-Bailey revealed her radical plan to 'bring democracy to the economy', abolish the House of Lords, end the 'gentleman's club' of politics and devolve power to the regions after admitting the British public did not trust Labour over Brexit and antisemitism at the last election. 

Speaking at her leadership campaign launch in Manchester this evening, Ms Long-Bailey told the party faithful she would replace 'the only unelected second chamber in the whole of Europe' with an elected senate and devolve power from Westminster to a regional or local level. 

The leadership hopeful added that it was 'not enough to expect democracy in our politics - we need democracy in our economy too' as she seemed to double down on the left-wing policies of Jeremy Corbyn's leadership.

The MP for Salford and Eccles and key Corbyn ally in the last election used her campaign speech to admit 'many didn't trust [Labour in 2019], whether it was Brexit, whether it was tackling antisemitism - they didn't believe in us enough'.

She added: 'We've got a lot of work to do to rebuild trust with the British public because it's no good promising the world if people don't trust you with the basics.' 

The speech comes after the publication of a new poll which showed the battle is increasingly a two horse race between Sir Keir Starmer and Ms Long-Bailey. 

A YouGov survey suggested Sir Keir had extended his lead over his rivals with the shadow Brexit secretary on course to beat Ms Long-Bailey in the final round of voting by 63 per cent to 37 per cent. 

Speaking at her leadership campaign launch in Manchester this evening, Rebecca Long-Bailey told the party faithful she would replace 'the only unelected second chamber in the whole of Europe' with an elected senate and devolve power from Westminster to a regional or local level

A YouGov poll of 1,005 Labour members, pictured, found that Keir Starmer was the clear favourite to win the nomination

A YouGov poll of 1,005 Labour members, pictured, found that Keir Starmer was the clear favourite to win the nomination

That is an increase for Sir Keir, pictured, on the company's poll last month which put him on 61 per cent and Ms Long-Bailey on 39 per cent

That is an increase for Sir Keir on the company's poll last month which put him on 61 per cent and Ms Long-Bailey on 39 per cent. The recent poll numbers are likely to cause alarm in Ms Long-Bailey's team as she appears to be losing ground to her fellow front runner.

Ms Long-Bailey tonight admitted Labour 'needs to look like a government in waiting - but we can't win by throwing away the very things that give power of purpose'. 

She added: 'The fight for a liveable climate, for workers' rights, for democratic ownership - these struggles are ultimately indivisible, we cannot sacrifice one in pursuit of another and expect to succeed, so we must unite, we must rebuild, and when we win, we win for all of us, that's the Labour party I believe in. And that is our path to power.'  

The Left-wing hopeful seemingly voiced understanding for Brexit voters, saying: 'The story from the last couple of years is that many people instinctively feel there is something wrong with their laws being drafted hundreds of miles away by a distant and largely unaccountable bureaucratic elite in Brussels.'

She added that when she was growing up, Westminster did not feel much less distant to her - 'and it still doesn't today; that's why I want to shake up the way government works'.

The speech comes after the publication of a new poll which showed the battle is increasingly a two horse race between Sir Keir Starmer and Ms Long-Bailey

The speech comes after the publication of a new poll which showed the battle is increasingly a two horse race between Sir Keir Starmer and Ms Long-Bailey

The Left-wing hopeful also seemingly voiced understanding for Brexit voters, saying: 'The story from the last couple of years is that many people instinctively feel there is something wrong with their laws being drafted hundreds of miles away by a distant and largely unaccountable bureaucratic elite in Brussels'

Rebecca Long-Bailey doing interviews before her campaign launch

The Left-wing hopeful also seemingly voiced understanding for Brexit voters, saying: 'The story from the last couple of years is that many people instinctively feel there is something wrong with their laws being drafted hundreds of miles away by a distant and largely unaccountable bureaucratic elite in Brussels'

'I want to sweep away the House of Lords - the only unelected second chamber in the whole of Europe - and I want to replace it with a new elected senate based outside of London.

The docker's daughter aiming for Labour's top job 

Ms Long-Bailey, 40, is the hard-Left daughter of a Salford docker, groomed to take the helm of the Corbynite project by self-declared Marxist John McDonnell.

She grew up in Old Trafford, Manchester, where she was exposed to left-wing politics from a young age.

Her father Jimmy worked as a docker at Salford Quays and trade union representative at Shell at a time when workers' collectives wielded enormous power and threats of staff walkouts struck fear into ministers.

On graduating from a Catholic high school, she worked in a pawn shop - an eye-opening experience which she says taught her 'more about the struggles of life than any degree or qualification ever could'.

After holding down other jobs such as a call-centre operator, a furniture factory worker and a postwoman, she eventually studied to become a solicitor.

'We will end the gentleman's club of politics and we will be setting out to go further by devolving power out of Westminster to a regional or local level. 

'An elected senate would have a new democratic legitimacy and should have new powers to reflect that.

'In my view this should include holding the government to account on the impact of new legislation on our wealth, our wellbeing and our environment.'

Ms Long-Bailey voiced support for a kind of socialism where everyone was free to climb and succeed in a society where 'structural inequality and financial insecurity are gone'. 

'And that means expanding alternative models of ownership and collective bargaining rights in our economy, that means fighting racism and xenophobia that means fighting for LGBTQ+ rights and gender equality.

'And it means rebalancing our economy so every town, city and region can thrive again with renewed pride - pride rooted in solidarity, inclusivity and internationalism.

'But of course none of this will happen without a Labour government.'

She also spoke about a trip to Amsterdam she had made before entering politics, being asked 'Did you inhale?'

To laughter and cheers from the largely young audience at the event, Mrs Long-Bailey replied: 'I'll leave it up to you to decide why I went to Amsterdam, for flower markets or to partake in local delicacies.'

She added

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