Steel memorial to Alan Turing 'threatens the existing character' of King's ...

An Alan Turing sculpture which is set to be constructed at the mathematician's alma mater could threaten the 'existing character' of the Cambridge College, Historic England has claimed. 

The 12ft steel structure, designed by Sir Antony Gormley, will commemorate the Second World War code-breaker, who attended King's College in Cambridge between 1931 and 1934.

Sir Antony's memorial will look over the chapel at the College in a reminder of Turing's achievements, but Historic England has warned the statue 'would be at odds with the existing character of the College.'

It added the memorial could impact the 'striking collection of historic buildings within a sweeping landscape' which made up a 'much-loved view in the city', the Times reported. 

The 12ft steel structure, designed by Sir Antony Gormley, will commemorate Second World War code breaker Alan Turing (pictured), who attended King's College in Cambridge between 1931 and 1934

The 12ft steel structure, designed by Sir Antony Gormley, will commemorate Second World War code breaker Alan Turing (pictured), who attended King's College in Cambridge between 1931 and 1934

Under plans submitted to Cambridge City Council, the work will consist of 19 steel slabs stacked against each other in the form of an abstract metal figure.  

Adam Gardner, deputy Clerk of Works at King's College Cambridge, said in planning documents that the sculpture would be located 'beside a pathway that is constantly flowing with students, fellows and members of the University.'

He added that the artwork is 'inspired by the work and life of Alan Turing himself', explaining it is large enough to 'stand directly on the ground.' 

But Historic England fears the plans could severely impact the character of the 15th century college, which is part of the University of Cambridge.

Claire Campbell, from Historic England, said: 'We recognise that the proposal would deliver some enhancement to the significance of the King's College through the introduction of a sculpture by a renowned contemporary sculptor and the visible commemoration of Turing. These could also be considered as public benefits.

'However, we consider the introduction of an eye catching sculpture in a prominent position within the landscape at King's would be at odds with the existing character of the College.

Under plans submitted to Cambridge City Council, the work will consist of 19 steel slabs stacked against each other in the form of an abstract metal figure (Pictured: an artist impression of the memorial)

Under plans submitted to Cambridge City Council, the work will consist of 19 steel slabs stacked against each other in the form of an abstract metal figure (Pictured: an artist impression of the memorial)

Sir Antony's memorial will look over the chapel at King's College (pictured) in a reminder of Turing's achievements, but Historic England has warned the statue 'would be at odds with the existing character of the College'

Sir Antony's memorial will look over the chapel at King's College (pictured) in a reminder of Turing's achievements, but Historic England has warned the statue 'would be at odds with the existing character of the College'

'This would result in harm, of a less than substantial nature, to the significance of the listed buildings and landscape, and by extension the conservation area.' 

Sir Antony, who is best known for the Angel of the North near Gateshead, studied archaeology, anthropology and history of art at Trinity College

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