Coronavirus deaths are TWICE as high in poor areas of England and Wales: ...

People living in the poorest parts of England and Wales are dying from coronavirus at more than double the rate of those in affluent areas, shocking figures show.  

An Office for National Statistics report found the most deprived regions suffered 55 deaths per 100,000 people, compared with 25 deaths in the wealthiest areas.

London, the heart of Britain's outbreak, had the highest mortality rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people - more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities. 

The boroughs of Newham, Brent and Hackney were the three worst-hit regions in all of the country, suffering 144, 142 and 127 deaths per 100,000, respectively. 

Boroughs in the capital accounted for all of the top ten worst hit local authorities, the report showed. 

Hastings, in affluent East Sussex, and Norwich had the lowest COVID-19 death rates – suffering six and five deaths per 100,000, respectively. 

It comes as a separate report by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) found black and Asian Britons are two-and-a-half times more likely to die from COVID-19 than whites. 

Death rates from all causes are higher in poorer areas, the ONS said, but the pandemic appears to be pushing the rates even higher

 Death rates from all causes are higher in poorer areas, the ONS said, but the pandemic appears to be pushing the rates even higher

Boroughs in London accounted for all of the top ten worst hit local authorities, the report showed

Boroughs in London accounted for all of the top ten worst hit local authorities, the report showed

Experts say those living in poverty smoke and drink alcohol more, and are more likely to be obese - all of which increase the likelihood of chronic health conditions.

Patients with pre-existing health troubles struggle to fight off COVID-19 before it becomes life threatening. 

And poor people are also more likely to use public transport more often and live in crowded houses - driving up their chance of catching and spreading the virus.   

The second worst-hit area behind London was the West Midlands, where the death rate is 43.2 per 100,000.   

The report analysed 20,283 virus deaths registered in England and Wales from March 1 to April 17.

It also found the fatality rate is six times higher among those living in major cities than in rural areas.  No rural area had a death rate higher than 21.9.

The report found the fatality rate was higher among men in the most deprived areas (76.7 deaths per 100,000 population) than it is for women (39.6).

London , the heart of Britain's outbreak, had the highest mortality rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people - more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities. The second worst-hit area was the West Midlands, where the death rate is 43.2 per 100,000, closely followed by the North West (40)

London , the heart of Britain's outbreak, had the highest mortality rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people - more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities. The second worst-hit area was the West Midlands, where the death rate is 43.2 per 100,000, closely followed by the North West (40)

The report analysed 20,283 virus deaths registered in England and Wales from March 1 to April 17. It also found the fatality rate is six times higher among those living in major cities than in rural areas. No rural area had a death rate higher than 21.9

The report analysed 20,283 virus deaths registered in England and Wales from March 1 to April 17. It also found the fatality rate is six times higher among those living in major cities than in rural areas. No rural area had a death rate higher than 21.9

In Wales, the most deprived regions suffered 44.6 coronavirus deaths per 100,000 population - nearly double the least deprived areas (23.2 deaths).

Death rates from all causes are higher in poorer areas, the ONS said, but the pandemic appears to be pushing the rates even higher.    

Nick Stripe, Head of Health Analysis, Office for National Statistics, said: 'People living in more deprived areas have experienced COVID-19 mortality rates more than double those living in less deprived areas. 

'In contrast, the region with the lowest proportion of COVID-19 deaths was the South West, which saw just over 1 in 10 deaths involving coronavirus. 

'The 11 local authorities with the highest mortality rates were all London boroughs, with Newham, Brent and Hackney suffering the highest rates of COVID-19 related deaths.

'People living in more deprived areas have experienced COVID-19 mortality rates more than double those living in less deprived areas. 

'General mortality rates are normally higher in more deprived areas, but so far COVID-19 appears to be taking them higher still.'

TEN AREAS WITH THE HIGHEST COVID-19 DEATH RATE (PER 100,000 PEOPLE)
Newham – 144.3  Brent – 141.5 Hackney – 127.4 Tower Hamlets – 122.9 Haringey – 119.3 Harrow – 114.7 Southwark – 108.1 Lewisham – 106.4 Lambeth – 104.3 Ealing 103.2
TEN AREAS WITH THE LOWEST COVID-19 DEATH RATE (PER 100,000 PEOPLE)
Norwich - 4.9 Hastings - 6.3 Grimsby - 8 Stockton-on-Tees - 8.9 Scunthorpe - 10.5 Plymouth - 10.6  Weston-super-Mare - 11 Lincoln - 11.3 Worthing - 12.1 Bournemouth - 13.2 

It comes after an Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) report found the death rate among Black African Britons was three times that of the white British population.

An Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) report found the death rate among Black African Britons was three times that of the white British population.

The IFS said there was 'unlikely' to be a single explanation for the higher fatalities, but noted that minorities were more likely to be key workers. 

Of all working-age Black Africans, a third are employed in these roles – 50 per cent more than the white British population, according to the think-tank.

Meanwhile Pakistani, Indian and Black African men are 90 per cent, 150 per cent and 310 per cent -more likely to work in healthcare than white British men, respectively.

Hospital workers are

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