Jared Kushner LAUGHS as he asked to apologize for fanning 'birther' ...

Jared Kushner laughed during a Friday afternoon interview with CNN's Christiane Amanpour when she gave him the opportunity to apologize on behalf of President Donald for spreading 'misinformation' about Kamala Harris' eligibility to be vice president. 

'Look the president is about to do a press conference any minute I'll let the CNN reporters ask him about that,' Kushner said after a brief chuckle. 'Again, we've spent now just as much time on this as we had on the president's historic peace deal.' 

At the White House briefing, denied having an issue with a 'strong woman of color' being in the presidential race. 

'As you know, none whatsoever,' the president said from the podium. 

Jared Kushner laughed during an interview with CNN's  Christiane Amanpour when she asked if he wanted to apologize on behalf of his candidate, President Donald Trump, for fanning the flames of a 'birther' theory about Sen. Kamala Harris, Joe Biden's running mate

Jared Kushner laughed during an interview with CNN's  Christiane Amanpour when she asked if he wanted to apologize on behalf of his candidate, President Donald , for fanning the flames of a 'birther' theory about Sen. Kamala Harris, Joe Biden's running mate 

President Trump also said Friday that he had no problem 'whatsoever' with a 'strong woman of color' in the presidential race. The remarks came after he retweeted a tweet calling Harris 'camel laugh' and fanned the flames of another 'birther' conspiracy theory

President also said Friday that he had no problem 'whatsoever' with a 'strong woman of color' in the presidential race. The remarks came after he retweeted a tweet calling Harris 'camel laugh' and fanned the flames of another 'birther' conspiracy theory 

Earlier though, had retweeted posts calling Harris 'camel laugh,' a day after he refused to say she was eligible to serve as vice president - as Kushner, his son-in-law and a top White House aide, refused to bat down 'birther' conspiracy theories about Harris in an earlier interview. 

'He just said that he had no idea whether that's right or wrong,' Kushner told 'CBS This Morning' co-host Anthony Mason. 

Pressed on whether he and the campaign accepts that Harris is a qualified candidate, Kushner said, 'I personally have no reason to believe she's not.'

'She was born in Oakland, California,' Mason said. Kushner replied: 'Yeah.'

'Makes her a qualified candidate. Why didn't the president take the opportunity to debunk that theory?' Mason asked.

'I have not had a chance to discuss this with him, but again, let his words speak for himself,' Kushner said.  

During his back-and-forth with Amanpour, Kushner suggested journalists had merely misinterpreted the president's Thursday's comments about Harris. 

'I'll go back to the fact the media often gets distracted and confused by the president,' Kushner said. 

Kushner said what said was, 'I don't know anything about that.' 

At the Thursday briefing, was asked by a reporter whether he could 'definitively say' Harris was eligible since she was a 'anchor baby,' a negative term for immigrants who have children in the U.S. so that they can achieve citizenship.  

'So I just heard that. I heard it today. That she doesn't meet the requirements and by the way the lawyer that wrote that piece is a very highly qualified, very talented lawyer,' the president answered. 'I have no idea if that's right.' 

'I would have assumed the Democrats would have checked that out before she gets chosen to run for vice president,' went on, adding that the unfounded claims were 'very serious.' 

He then asked the reporter to explain what Harris' problem was. 

'You're saying that, they're saying that she doesn't qualify because she wasn't born in this country?' asked. 

The journalist replied explaining that Harris' parents were born abroad and weren't citizens at the time of her birth in the U.S. 

'I don't know about it, I just heard about it, I'll take a look,' said. 

Right-wing law professor John C. Eastman wrote an editorial Wednesday that argued that because Harris' parents weren't citizens when she was born in 1964 in Oakland, California then she might not fit the definition of eligibility under the U.S. Constitution. 

A number of Constitutional experts said that was flat-out false and Harris' defenders called it racist. 

Georgetown University Law Center professor Josh Chafetz told FactCheck.org Eastman's op-ed was nothing but 'racist nonsense.'  

'This is only the second time that that has happened in our nation's history. And the first time was with President Barack Obama. So why is it that only the two Black candidates are questioned about the legitimacy of their citizenship?,' Valerie Jarrett, a former top Obama advisor, told the Los Angeles Times.   

At the Thursday briefing, President Donald Trump said he has 'no idea' if Kamala Harris is eligible to be vice president, adding that an op-ed that suggested she wasn't was written by a 'very highly qualified, very talented lawyer'

At the Thursday briefing, President Donald said he has 'no idea' if Kamala Harris is eligible to be vice president, adding that an op-ed that suggested she wasn't was written by a 'very highly qualified, very talented lawyer'

A Newsweek op-ed argued that Kamala Harris (pictured) may not be eligible to be vice president because her parents weren't U.S. citizens when she was born in California in 1964. One prominent law professor called the editorial 'racist nonsense'

A Newsweek op-ed argued that Kamala Harris (pictured) may not be eligible to be vice president because her parents weren't U.S. citizens when she was born in California in 1964. One prominent law professor called the editorial 'racist nonsense'

Kamala Harris is pictured with her mother Shyamala Gopalan (left), who was born in India, and her father Donald Harris (right), who was born in Jamaica

Kamala Harris is pictured with her mother Shyamala Gopalan (left), who was born in India, and her father Donald Harris (right), who was born in Jamaica

Eastman had run for California attorney general in 2010, the same year as Harris, but was beaten in the GOP primary, while she won the race. 

John C. Eastman wrote a controversial editorial for Newsweek that suggested Kamala Harris wasn't eligible to run for VP. The op-ed was widely viewed as racist and untrue

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John C. Eastman wrote a controversial editorial for Newsweek that suggested Kamala Harris wasn't eligible to run for VP. The op-ed was widely viewed as racist and untrue

But a tweet sharing the editorial was retweeted by the campaign's Senior Legal Advisor Jenna Ellis.

'It's an open question, and one I think Harris should answer so the American people know for sure she is eligible,' Ellis later 

A spokesperson for the campaign never answered DailyMail.com's inquiry on whether the campaign

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