Britain records more coronavirus deaths

England has reported four more Covid-19 deaths taking the total to 41,555, while Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have each reported zero.

The Department of Health are yet to confirm the early count, which is calculated by adding the deaths reported by each home nation.

NHS England was the only agency to have reported deaths today - four in hospitals, all on September 5. But these may not be included in the Government's tally later due to differences in cut-off points.  

New Covid-19 cases will also be revealed this afternoon, after a 'concerning' 3,000 new cases reported on Sunday.

Bolton, Leeds, Birmingham and Manchester have reported significant hikes in cases in the past week, with infection rates reaching levels seen during April, May and June.

The Health Secretary said today the coronavirus 'is not out of control' in Britain amid scientists' warnings the Government has lost its grip on spread of the disease. 

But he pleaded with young people specifically to adhere to social distancing and think of their grandparents because cases are being driven by under 25s in 'affluent areas'.

Downing Street warned the 'concerning' number of cases would generally be expected to lead to a rise across the population as a whole.

Today Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said it is 'dangerous' to think 'we no longer need to worry' and the current restrictions are an 'overreaction'. 

She also said there is a 'warning' in the rise in Covid-19 hospital admissions in Scotland - a possible indication cases are spreading to vulnerable people.

It comes as swathes of Britons headed back to work today with traffic and public transport returning to pre-Covid levels. 

The UK recorded its highest number of daily Covid-19 cases since May on Sunday. Some 2,988 were reported in just 24 hours

The UK recorded its highest number of daily Covid-19 cases since May on Sunday. Some 2,988 were reported in just 24 hours

In other coronavirus developments;

More than a hundred NHS Trusts may be overwhelmed this winter if the coronavirus hospitalisation rate surges to the level seen in April, an analysis has revealed; Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine will most likely be rolled out in the 'first few months' of next year, according to the Health Secretary Matt Hancock; A second wave of coronavirus may not hit the UK until spring 2021 with a cold winter likely to impose its own 'mini-quarantine', a scientist has said.
COVID-19 VACCINE MOST LIKELY IN THE 'FIRST FEW MONTHS' OF 2021, SAYS HANCOCK

Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine will most likely be rolled out in the 'first few months' of next year, according to the Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

The jab was expected at the end of 2020 but its creators have tempered expectations and pushed it back to next year.

Mr Hancock said today he still had some optimism the most vulnerable people will get their hands on the vaccine in the coming months in a 'best-case scenario'.

But he admitted the more likely outcome would be a 2021 roll out of the jab, known as AZD1222, which was created by Oxford and owned by UK drug giant AstraZeneca.

The Health Secretary revealed manufacturing was already underway in the UK for 30million doses, enough to vaccinate half the population.

He said that having them on standby meant they could be dished out to those most in need as soon as the vaccine is given the green light by regulators. 

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Yesterday the UK recorded its highest number of daily Covid-19 cases since May after 2,988 were reported in just 24 hours.

The last time the UK's caseload was this high was May 23 - 15 weeks ago - when 2,959 people tested positive. 

Bolton, a town in Greater Manchester, has the highest number of cases in England, with 333 new diagnoses recorded in the seven days to September 3. 

It's the equivalent of 115.8 cases per 100,000 people – up sharply from 36.5 in the previous week and the highest rate of new cases Bolton has recorded to date.

Rossendale, a Lancashire borough, is also seeing infection rates equivalent to May. 

It has the second highest rate in England, with some 52 new cases were recorded in the seven days to September 3 – the equivalent of 72.7 per 100,000 people, up from 19.6 in the previous week.

Leeds (41.6 cases per 100,000) and South Tyneside (68) are both seeing infection rates level with mid-May, while Manchester (50.1) and Birmingham (49.3) are at late-April figures.

The escalating Covid-19 cases in the UK follows the same trends in France and Spain, and the releasing of several lockdown restrictions.  

Speaking on LBC radio this morning, Mr Hancock said: 'This rise in case we have seen in the last few days is concerning, and it's concerning because we have seen a rise in cases in France, Spain and some other countries in Europe.

'Nobody wants to see a second wave here. It just reinforces the point that people must follow the social distancing rules, they are so important.' 

Asked by presenter Nick Ferrari if the UK had 'lost control', as suggested by some experts, Mr Hancock said: 'No, but the whole country needs to follow social distancing.'

Mr Hancock said the most important point to get across was that the uptick in cases in the past few days have been in younger people under 25, 'especially 17 to 21 year olds'. 

Nicola Sturgeon said today it is 'dangerous' to think 'we no longer need to worry' and the current restrictions are an 'overreaction'.

The surge in cases has not been clearly evident in hospitalisations or deaths in the UK so far, further evidence the

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