slams Meghan Markle and says he is 'not a fan of hers' and says he wishes ...

President Donald slammed Meghan Markle from the White House podium after she and Prince Harry recorded a video message urging Americans to vote, hinting they support Democrat Joe Biden. 

'I'm not a fan of hers.' said Wednesday to a question posed by DailyMail.com. 'I would say this - and she has probably has heard that - I wish a lot of luck to Harry because he's going to need it.'  

Harry and Meghan, now ensconced in an L.A. mansion as Election Day approaches after relinquishing their royal titles, made their remarks just weeks before the Nov. 3 elections, with Americans in some states already going to the polls.

'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity,' said Harry – in a line some observers in Britain and the U.S. immediately took to be a plug for Joe Biden and a slap at President .  

President Donald Trump slammed Meghan Markle from the White House podium Wednesday, telling DailyMail.com that he's 'not a fan of hers.' 'I wish a lot of luck to Harry because he's going to need it'

President Donald slammed Meghan Markle from the White House podium Wednesday, telling DailyMail.com that he's 'not a fan of hers.' 'I wish a lot of luck to Harry because he's going to need it'  

Said the California-born Markle, 39: 'We're six weeks out from the election, and today is Voter Registration Day. Every four years, we're told the same thing, 'This is the most important election of our lifetime.' But this one is. When we vote, our values are put into action, and our voices are heard.' 

Earlier, the president's campaign manager Corey Lewandowski teed off on the couple. 

'They made Britain great again by leaving, I hope they do the same for us,' Lewandowski, now a senior 2020 advisor to the campaign, told DailyMail.com Wednesday, in comments after Harry and Meghan's comments in a Time 100 video message made waves on both sides of the Atlantic.  

campaign spokesman Jason Miller indicated, however, he saw no such preference in Prince Harry's words.

'I'm assuming you're asking me because of Joe Biden's record of hateful and divisive language, particularly toward the African American community?' he responded when asked by DailyMail.com for comment. 

Then he wrote: 'I read this as warranted criticism of Joe Biden's racist policies. He's the only person I know of who has spoken at a Klan member's funeral!' – a reference to Biden's eulogy for former the late Senate leader Robert C. Byrd, who was a klan member in West Virginia in the 1940s but later apologized for what he called a 'sad mistake.' 

'They made Britain great again by leaving, I hope they do the same for us,' Corey Lewandowski, now a senior 2020 advisor to the Trump campaign, told DailyMail.com

'They made Britain great again by leaving, I hope they do the same for us,' Corey Lewandowski, now a senior 2020 advisor to the campaign, told DailyMail.com

Markle told Marie Claire in August that she intended to vote. 'I know what it's like to have a voice, and also what it's like to feel voiceless,' she said. 'I also know that so many men and women have put their lives on the line for us to be heard. And that opportunity, that fundamental right, is in our ability to exercise our right to vote and to make all of our voices heard.'

Before marrying Harry but after 's election, Markle called 'misogynistic' and 'divisive' in a TV appearance. 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle 'crossed a line' by speaking out about the US election and 'effectively telling Americans to vote against ', royal insiders believe. 

The Duke of Sussex told voters to 'reject hate speech' while the Duchess called the presidential race the 'most important election of our lifetime' as the couple urged Americans to register to vote.

Speaking in a Time 100 video message, apparently filmed from their California home, Harry admitted he was not eligible to vote - adding that he had never voted in the UK either where convention dictates that royals keep well clear of politics. 

While Harry and Meghan did not name their favored candidate, many viewers thought it 'obvious' they were backing Joe Biden over Donald - although a source close to Harry denied this. 

Royal experts told MailOnline that the couple should give up their titles and sever their links to the monarchy for good if they wanted to comment on US politics, while insiders told The Times that palace aides would be concerned about their intervention.   

MailOnline editor-at-large Piers Morgan said: 'Prince Harry poking his woke nose into the US election and effectively telling Americans to vote against President is completely unacceptable behaviour for a member of the Royal Family.' 

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

For his part, Harry said: 'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity'

For his part, Harry said: 'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity'

Former Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker, the author of the book And What Do You Do? What The Royal Family Don't Want You To Know, said Harry should not speak out about US politics while he is still a 'representative' of the UK. 

'I think it's appropriate for any private citizen to comment on the US election. The problem is that Harry has retained his HRH status and is not a private citizen but still a representative of this country,' Mr Baker told MailOnline. 

'He needs to stop trying to have a foot in both camps - royal when it suits him and private when it doesn't.

'Or to turn on its head the old phrase, I agree with what he says but disagree with his right to say it.'

Royal biographer Robert Jobson told MailOnline that it 'may be easier' for Meghan and Harry to give up their royal titles altogether given the 'business and political agenda they appear to want to pursue'. 

Mr Jobson, whose latest book is called The Royal Family Operations Manual, said the couple were now 'completely detached' from the British monarchy and would be best off abandoning their titles altogether.  

'Meghan, after all, holds American citizenship and has always voted,' he said. 'The business about royals not getting involved in politics is less clear when it comes to Meghan or what the protocol should be in this case.

'But as she is now back living in her country I am sure many would think it wrong that she is not allowed to exercise her democratic right to vote.

'Royals even in this country are entitled to their opinion and, such as the very vocal the Prince of Wales and Prince William voice them, particularly on the environment and the natural world. They see this as leadership.

'The important part is that they are not partisan, as for the monarch or her direct heir to be partisan could cause a constitutional crisis.'

How British royals are expected to keep out of politics  

Under Britain's constitutional monarchy, powers which theoretically belong to the Queen - such as appointing ministers and approving legislation - are exercised in her name by political leaders. 

This system means that political decisions are taken by the elected government rather than unelected royals, while keeping the monarchy as a symbol of the British state and its traditions. 

The royals' political neutrality, which the Queen has scrupulously observed for 68 years, is key to maintaining this balance and to preserving the monarchy's popularity. 

A YouGov poll earlier this year found majority support among both Conservative and Labour voters as well as Brexiteers and Europhiles for maintaining the British monarchy.  

The Queen's uncle King Edward VIII had to abdicate in 1936 because the government refused to support his planned marriage to American divorcee Wallis Simpson - fatally compromising his neutrality.   

While there is no law explicitly preventing the royal family from voting in UK elections, doing so would be an unacceptable breach of protocol.   

The Queen holds weekly conversations with her prime ministers and she is entitled to 'advise and warn' them when necessary, but the nature of her advice is never made public.  

Even her guarded comment that voters should 'think very carefully about the future' ahead of the 2014 Scottish independence referendum was seen as an unusual intervention.  

Prince Charles is known for writing lengthy letters to ministers on policy subjects such as agriculture, some of which were made public in 2015. 

William and Kate have also spoken out on the environment, launching a prize to tackle climate issues last year. 

Princess Diana - who like Harry and Meghan became semi-detached from the monarchy - was known for her campaigning on land mines, once allegedly describing the UK government's policy as 'hopeless'. 

Her involvement sparked criticism from some Conservative MPs, but the Labour government that took office shortly before her death was more favourable to her campaign.  

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Mr Jobson said he was 'increasingly open' to the idea of stripping the Sussexes of their royal titles for their own benefit and that of the royal family.   

'Frankly, I think it would be better for Harry to withdraw, along with his son, from the line of succession to avoid further confusion,' he said. 

'By saying they are HRHs and the Duke and Duchess, but not allowed to use the titles, just confuses the situation.

'With that issue out of the way, Meghan encouraging people to vote is something that would be praised not criticised.

'She speaks well and has passion for political issues. Without a royal title to hold her back it may set her free to pursue a political career.

'Ditching his title, and that includes 'Prince' would free up Harry too, in the land where he says he is happy and wants to make this life and where titles mean nothing.'  

A former palace adviser told The Times that Harry and Meghan's comments were likely to cause 'concern' among royal aides. 

'The political arena is very sensitive for all members of the royal family. You cannot have an apolitical institution, which is what a hereditary monarchy is, and have members of the royal family making even slightly political comments,' they said. 

'Courtiers would be extremely concerned that if they are going to continue to comment on what could be the most contentious US presidential election in living memory, how difficult could that get?'. 

Another source in Palace circles said the couple had 'crossed a line' with their intervention on Tuesday. 

Harry and Meghan spoke in a video clip which was broadcast as part of TIME's publication of its annual list of the world's 100 most influential people.    

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were included in the 2018 list, but not in this year's edition. 

'We're just six weeks out from Election Day and today is National Voter

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