Party City removes Halloween costume of Confederate General Robert E. Lee

Party City, one of the nation’s largest party supply retailers, has removed from its shelves a Halloween costume of a Confederate soldier after a white Virginia woman who adopted two black children said it was racist.

Caroline Brasler of Arlington, Virginia, was shopping at the Party City store in Bailey’s Crossroads last week when she noticed two costumes depicting rebel soldiers wearing a hat with the Confederate battle flag.

One of the costumes was of General Robert E. Lee. The other costume depicted a Confederate officer.

Brasler, who took photos of the costumes and posted them on her Facebook account, was looking to buy Halloween costumes for her two young girls - Meredith, 12, and Olivia, 10.

The image above shows a Halloween costume of Confederate General Robert E. Lee

The above image shows a Halloween costume of a Confederate officer

A Party City store in suburban Arlington, Virginia, removed from its shelves two Halloween costumes depicting Confederate General Robert E. Lee (left) and a Confederate officer (right)

The costumes were removed after Caroline Brasler of Arlington, Virginia, noticed them while shopping in the store last week

The costumes were removed after Caroline Brasler of Arlington, Virginia, noticed them while shopping in the store last week

Brasler, who took photos of the costumes and posted them on her Facebook account, was looking to buy Halloween costumes for her two young girls - Meredith, 12, and Olivia, 10. Both of the girls were adopted.

Brasler, who took photos of the costumes and posted them on her Facebook account, was looking to buy Halloween costumes for her two young girls - Meredith, 12, and Olivia, 10. Both of the girls were adopted.

‘The Confederate flag to me is a symbol of racism,’ she told WUSA-TV.

‘To have that out there for a child to wear on Halloween sends so many horrible messages.’

Brasler added: ‘I'm the adoptive parent of two beautiful African American girls.

‘We discuss race, we respect race.

‘And to see something like that just flies in the face of everything I try to teach them to be proud young women.’

¿I'm the adoptive parent of two beautiful African American girls,' Brasler said. ¿We discuss race, we respect race. And to see something like that just flies in the face of everything I try to teach them to be proud young women.¿

‘I'm the adoptive parent of two beautiful African American girls,' Brasler said. ‘We discuss race, we respect race. And to see something like that just flies in the face of everything I try to teach them to be proud young women.’

Brasler said that after she saw the Confederate costumes at the store, she refused to spend her money at that location. Instead, she¿ll buy vampire and zombie unicorn costumes for the girls somewhere else

Brasler said that after she saw the Confederate costumes at the store, she refused to spend her money at that location. Instead, she’ll buy vampire and zombie unicorn costumes for the girls somewhere else

A store manager at the Party City location confirmed to DailyMail.com that the costumes were removed

A store manager at the Party City location confirmed to DailyMail.com that the costumes were removed

Brasler said Olivia asked her why she was taking a photograph of the costumes.

‘I said, “That's a Confederate flag, that's a symbol of hate,” and she said, “Oh, ma, really?”

THE FLAG OF THE CONFEDERACY

The Civil War-era Battle Flag of the Army of Northern Virginia is today known as the symbol of the Confederacy

The Civil War-era Battle Flag of the Army of Northern Virginia is today known as the symbol of the Confederacy

What is today considered the Confederate flag was never the official national flag of the 13 states which made up the Confederate States of America from 1861 until 1865.

The banner that is often hoisted at rallies today is a version of the Battle Flag of the Army of Northern Virginia.

Also known as the 'Dixie flag,' 'rebel flag', or 'battle flag,' the design has come to be associated with the racial history of the South.

The Confederate States of America were formed in 1861 when 11 states seceded from the union in order to protect the institution of slavery.

The North eventually defeated the South in the Civil War, resulting in the abolition of slavery.

But racial injustices continued, particularly in the South, where blacks were subject to systematic discrimination and violence at the hands of whites.

While the flag is often flown by non-extremists who cite Southern pride and heritage, the symbol has also been adopted by extremist groups like neo-Nazis and other white supremacist organizations, according to the Anti-Defamation League. 

The use of the Confederate battle flag by extremist groups has prompted widespread calls for the banner to be banned and for statues and monuments honoring Civil War-era figures from the South to be taken down. 

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‘Then she took off for the candy aisle.’

Brasler said that after she saw the Confederate costumes at the store, she refused to spend her money at that location.

Instead, she’ll buy vampire and zombie unicorn costumes for the girls somewhere else.

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‘No more princesses for them!’ she said.

A store manager at the Bailey’s Crossroads location told DailyMail.com on Tuesday that the costumes in question have been removed.

In a statement, Party City said the costumes were not sanctioned by the company’s corporate offices and that they were sold at the discretion of the franchise owner.

‘At Party City, we do not tolerate racism or hatred of any kind, and we stand together in solidarity with our diverse colleagues, customers, and communities,’ the company in a statement.

‘As the leader in Halloween with more than 60 million

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