Has Boris cancelled Halloween? No10 issues warning over trick-or-treat ...

Boris Johnson appeared to pour a large cauldron of humbug on Hallowe'en fun today as Downing Street warned against trick-or-treating. 

No10 warned that families under local lockdowns in England - some 12 million people in total - should not mix, when asked whether traditional ghoulish events should take place.

And it warned that elsewhere the Rule of Six applied, meaning parents face fines of up to £200 if their children are caught in larger groups going door-to-door.

Asked repeatedly about whether trick-or-treating can go ahead around October 31, the PM's deputy spokesman said: 'The Rule of Six is clear, it includes children. We are asking people not to meet in groups of six or more. 

'In local lockdown areas we have been very clear that households should not mix. In other areas not in lockdown the Rule of Six applies.

'It is correct parents will be fined if children meet in groups of more than six children.'

It came amid fears that London could follow parts of the North East and North West including Newcastle and Liverpool into localised lockdown. 

Asked repeatedly about whether trick-or-treating can go ahead around October 31, the PM's deputy spokesman said: 'The Rule of Six is clear, it includes children. We are asking people not to meet in groups of six or more'

Asked repeatedly about whether trick-or-treating can go ahead around October 31, the PM's deputy spokesman said: 'The Rule of Six is clear, it includes children. We are asking people not to meet in groups of six or more'

 

How Covid-19 infection rates DOUBLED in most local lockdown areas

One in three Britons will be living under tougher Covid-19 rules than the rest of the country tomorrow, despite data showing local lockdowns don't work in most places and that infection rates have actually risen.

From Saturday, two million residents in Liverpool, Warrington, Hartlepool and Middlesbrough will be banned from meeting people they don't live with indoors in a bid to curtail outbreaks there.

It will mean a total of 22.4million Brits will be living under some form of economically crippling and socially restricting local shutdown. Ministers have justified the measures by claiming they are the only way to stop a second national wave of the disease.

But data shows Covid-19 infections have doubled in the majority of areas in England that have been subject to long-term restrictions. In 11 out of 16 English cities and towns hit with lockdowns in the last nine weeks, the infection rate has risen at least two-fold and in some cases by more than 10 times.

In Bolton, Britain's current Covid-19 hotspot, there were 200 infections per 100,000 in the last seven days, up from 14 per 100,000 on July 31. In Wigan cases have risen from seven per 100,000 people to 102 in the same period.  

Luton is the only area in the country which has successfully managed to drive down cases far enough to break free from the shackles of a local lockdown - but even the Bedfordshire town could be slapped with restrictions once again because cases have started to rebound.

Scientists, MPs and local leaders say adherence to the rules is low because they have been too 'complex and confusing' to follow. In Middlesbrough, the mayor Andy Preston said he would 'defy the government' and that his town would 'not accept these measures' because there was no evidence they would work.  

 

Advertisement

Boris Johnson will meet with civic leaders in the capital next week amid rising fears over the number of cases.

Mayor sadiq Khan has called for more restrictions ot be put in place.

Last night he was involved in a row with Shaun Bailey, the Tory candidate in the mayoral election due to take place in May.

Mr Bailey lashed out at the Government's homeworking rules, in an article for the City AM newspaper.

'Look around London and you see a city that has stalled. Tube use is down 70 per cent. High streets are empty. 69 per cent of Londoners are still working from home,' he wrote.

'We can talk about the cost to the economy — but we should also think about the cost to Londoners themselves. Because the truth is that I don’t believe coronavirus is a good reason to put hundreds of thousands of jobs at risk.

'Our city is built on people. And the more restrictions people face, the more our city is unable to function. 

'If we keep introducing new restrictions on businesses and workers, we’re putting livelihoods at risk — from small businesses to people who were struggling long before coronavirus hit.'

Mr Khan responded saying: 'This is very dangerous. Please ignore him. The Government advice is to work from home if you can - scientists say doing so could save lives. 

'Urging Londoners to disregard scientific and medical advice risks the lives of Londoners.'

It came as Nicola Sturgeon demanded one of her own MPs quits today after they flouted coronavirus self-isolation rules to attend the Commons.

The First Minister urged Margaret Ferrier to 'do the right thing' as she faced universal condemnation for her 'utterly indefensible' behaviour in going to Westminster while suffering symptoms - and then taking a train back to Scotland after her test was positive.

The flagrant breach of quarantine law by the Rutherglen & Hamilton West is potentially punishable with a £4,000 fine. DUP MP Jim Shannon revealed this afternoon that he dined with Ms Ferrier at Parliament on Monday night and was told to self-isolate, but had since tested negative.

Ms Sturgeon said she had made it 'crystal clear' to Ms Ferrier that she must resign. 'I've spoken to Margaret Ferrier and made clear my view that she should step down as an MP,' she said.

'I did so with a heavy heart - she is a friend & colleague - but her actions were dangerous & indefensible. I have no power to force an MP to resign but I hope she will do the right thing.'

Locals back back rebellious Middlesbrough mayor for rejecting lockdown and vow to ignore new restrictions 

Locals in Middlesbrough have rallied around their rebellious mayor after he vowed to defy the Government's lockdown to protect the 'jobs and mental health' of residents.

Andy Preston, an Independent, lashed out at ministers for their 'monstrous and frightening lack of communication and ignorance' in the strongest backlash yet against local lockdowns, which now cover 20million people - nearly a third of the UK population.

Constituents backed him for 'sticking up for people and trying to stop businesses going bust' as some said they would ignore the new restrictions.

The economic cost of local lockdowns is becoming increasingly clear, with the pub industry warning a quarter of venues could close permanently at the cost of 290,000 jobs and £7billion to the UK if restrictions continue well into next year.

The Middlesbrough lockdown starts on Saturday morning - at one minute past midnight - and will ban people from meeting up indoors with anyone outside their household, including pubs and restaurants.

Lockdowns in Hartlepool, Warrington and the Liverpool City Region, which includes Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens, and Wirral, will come in at the same time as Middlesbrough.

Advertisement

Earlier, the SNP's Westminster chief Ian Blackford, who has already stripped her of the whip, said this morning that she must 'reflect on her position'. 'I think it is obvious what she needs to do,' he told BBC Breakfast.

The Commons said one person who had come into contact with Ms Ferrier had been told to self-isolate, with investigations into who else might be at risk set to continue. Extra cleaning precautions have also been taken - although the damage might already have been done.

And new research today revealed coronaphobia is well and truly back among Britons as cases surge and restrictions are ramped up.

Anxiety about the disease has hit the highest level since May as the government scrambles to get rising infections under control - with a third of the population now under local lockdowns.

Three-quarters are now either very or somewhat worried about the impact of the disease on their lives.

Meanwhile, the public is increasingly shunning meeting indoors, and the proportion working from home has spiked.

The trends were highlighted in the latest social indicators published by the Office for National Statistics this morning, which surveyed people across Britain from September 24 to 27.

It found levels of socialising, eating out and travel slumped after rises during the summer.

Just 20 per cent of adults said they had met another household in a private place, down from 30 per cent the previous week.

After lockdown restrictions were imposed across swathes of the North, 37 per cent in areas subject to extra curbs said they had not met anyone outside their own household.

In places where the lockdown has not been ramped up beyond the Rule of Six, the figure was still 22 per cent.

Eight in 10 said they had 'always or often' maintained social distancing when they met other people.  

A man stands in a NOVID sanitisation booth during a demonstration in Liverpool city centre. NOVID is a walk-through fogging device, designed to eliminate any prospect of COVID-19 not just on the person walking through it, but also on the clothing they are wearing as well

A man stands in a NOVID sanitisation booth during a demonstration in Liverpool city centre. NOVID is a walk-through fogging device, designed to eliminate any prospect of COVID-19 not just on the person walking through it, but also on the clothing they are wearing as well

One in three Britons will be living under tougher Covid-19 rules than the rest of the country tomorrow, despite data showing local lockdowns don't work in most places and that infection rates have actually risen.

From Saturday, two million residents in Liverpool, Warrington, Hartlepool and Middlesbrough will be banned from meeting people they don't live with indoors in a bid to curtail outbreaks there.

It will mean a total of 22.4million Brits will be living under some form of economically crippling and socially restricting local shutdown. Ministers have justified the measures by claiming they are the only way to stop a second national wave of the disease.

But data shows Covid-19 infections have doubled in the majority of areas in England that have been subject to long-term restrictions. In 11 out of 16 English cities and towns hit with lockdowns in the last nine weeks, the infection rate has risen at least two-fold and in some cases by more than 10 times.

In Bolton, Britain's current Covid-19 hotspot, there were 200 infections per 100,000 in the last seven days, up from 14 per 100,000 on July 31. In Wigan cases have risen from seven per 100,000 people to 102 in the same period.  

Luton is the only area in the country which has successfully managed to drive down cases far enough to break free from the shackles of a local lockdown - but even the Bedfordshire town could be slapped with restrictions once again because cases have started to rebound.

Scientists, MPs and local leaders say adherence to the rules is low because they have been too 'complex and confusing' to follow. In Middlesbrough, the mayor Andy Preston said he would 'defy the government' and that his town would 'not accept these measures' because there was no evidence they would work.  

Mr Khan responded saying: 'This is very dangerous. Please ignore him. The Government advice is to work from home if you can - scientists say doing so could save lives'

Mr Khan responded saying: 'This is very dangerous. Please ignore him. The Government advice is to work from home if you can - scientists say doing so could save lives'

The number of people getting infected with coronavirus has fallen in the last week, official data showed today.

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated there were 8,400 daily cases of the disease in England in the week ending September 24.

This marks a 12.5 per cent fall from the 9,600 infection thought to have been occurring every day the week before.

The ONS described its findings as 'limited evidence' transmission of the virus 'may be levelling off following steep increases during August and September'.

But, because the study is only based on a few hundred positive swabs, the Government-run body said it is too early to say the UK is out of the woods yet.

The ONS report today is the first to report a dip in infections in the last two months, after cases started to rocket in August when lockdown was fully lifted.

But it comes on the heels of a wave of statistics yesterday suggesting the UK's spike in transmission is finally starting to slow down.

There were 6,914 cases picked up through the Government's official testing programme yesterday - just 4.2 per cent higher than last Thursday. This was significant because cases had been almost doubling every week since late August.

More proof England's second wave IS slowing down? Official data show there are 8,400 new coronavirus cases per day down from 9,600 last week - but the UK's R rate has crept up to a possible 1.6 as 55 more deaths confirmed in early count

The number of people getting infected with coronavirus has fallen in the last week, official data shows - adding to a growing body of evidence suggesting the UK's crisis is slowing.

An Office for National Statistics (ONS) report released today estimated there were 8,400 daily cases of the disease in England in the week ending September 24. This marks a 12.5 per cent fall from the 9,600 infection thought to have been occurring every day the week before.  

sonos sonos One (Gen 2) - Voice Controlled Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa Built-in - Black read more

The ONS described its findings as 'limited evidence' transmission of the virus 'may be levelling off following steep increases during August and September'. But, because the study is only based on

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Mother and father of former Manchester City academy player call for more mental ...
NEXT Troubled girl, 16, takes her own life on school grounds