Chuck Schumer demands 25th Amendment removal of Donald

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer is calling for the president's cabinet to make use of the 25th Amendment to declare President Donald unfit for office and put Vice President Mike Pence in charge – after fueled what he called in an 'insurrection' mob that ran wild in the Capitol Wednesday.

The New York senator who will soon become majority leader once Joe Biden is sworn in amid comes amid escalating concern among cabinet officials, former top aides, and his recently departed attorney general about the president's conduct and continued risks the president could pose to the country.

'The quickest and most effective way - it can be done today - to remove this president from office would be for the Vice President to immediately invoke the 25th amendment,' Schumer said.

'If the Vice President and the Cabinet refuse to stand up, Congress should reconvene to impeach the president,' Schumer added.

His statement came shortly after Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois became the first elected House Republican to call for the cabinet and Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to strip away 's power. 

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Just after 1pm, another bombshell dropped as Elaine Cha, the transportation secretary and wife of Mitch McConnell resigned over the violence - the first member of 's cabinet to quit. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer ¿ who will become majority leader once Joe Biden is sworn in ¿ issued a statement calling for swift action on the 25th Amendment ¿ while also leveling the threat of a second impeachment

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer – who will become majority leader once Joe Biden is sworn in – issued a statement calling for swift action on the 25th Amendment – while also leveling the threat of a second impeachment

'What happened at the U.S. Capitol yesterday was an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president. This president should not hold office one day longer,' Chuck Schumer said

'What happened at the U.S. Capitol yesterday was an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president. This president should not hold office one day longer,' Chuck Schumer said 

Republican congressman Adam Kinzinger demanded Mike Pence and the Cabinet remove Donald Trump by invoking the 25th Amendment immediately. He posted a video to Twitter in which he said he is calling for Donald Trump to be removed from office 'for the sake of our Democracy'

Republican congressman Adam Kinzinger demanded Mike Pence and the Cabinet remove Donald by invoking the 25th Amendment immediately. He posted a video to Twitter in which he said he is calling for Donald to be removed from office 'for the sake of our Democracy' 

'It's with a heavy heart I am calling for the sake of our Democracy that the 25th Amendment be invoked,' Kinzinger said in a statement he posted on Twitter.'  

AOC says Cabinet should use 25th Amendment and Congress should impeach - and wants Republican inciters expelled from House and Senate

AOC says Cabinet should use 25th Amendment and Congress should impeach - and wants Republican inciters expelled from House and Senate

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Kinzinger said 'invoked and inflamed passions that only gave fuel to the insurrection we saw.'

His comment followed reporters that members of 's cabinet have been discussing use of the 25th Amendment to the constitution to declare him unfit for office 

Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.) has released articles of impeachment he has drafted with Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) and Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.).

The articles state that ‘engaged in high crimes and misdemeanors’ by ‘willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.’

The articles cite ’s Wednesday remarks to supporters shortly before they stormed the Capitol during the electoral vote count. ‘Shortly before the Joint Session of Congress commenced,’ addressed supporters where he ‘reiterated false claims that “we won this election, and we won it by a landslide,”’ the articles state. also ‘wilfully made statements that encouraged – and foreseeably resulted in – imminent lawless action at the Capitol.’

The articles say a mob ‘incited by President ’ breached the Capitol and ‘interfered with the Joint Session’s solemn constitutional duty’ to certify the results.

They say the actions were ‘consistent with his prior efforts to subvert and obstruct’ the certification of the results. They mention his Jan. 2 phone call with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, where he asked the official to ‘find’ 11,780 votes that would give him victory.

Georgia certified the vote for Joe Biden.

‘gravely endangered the security’ of the U.S. and its institutions of government, the articles say. IT calls his actions ‘grossly incompatible with self-governance and the rule of law.’

If were impeached and convicted, he would be unable to hold future office of ‘honor, trust or profit’ under the U.S.

Former Attorney General Bill Barr – who departed his post before Christmas – called out for 'orchestrating a mob.'

Barr called it a 'betrayal of his office and supporters.'

He told the Associated Press that 'orchestrating a mob to pressure Congress is inexcusable.'

The talk of using the 25th Amendment comes amid fears of what damage might we able to due even in the short two weeks left in his tenure as aides flee his White House and he continues to lash out at enemies – with control of the military and massive executive power.

Several House Democrats have begun talk of rushing through an impeachment, after the failed January impeachment trial in the Senate.

The 25th Amendment, which also governs a president who voluntarily relinquishes power on a temporary basis, requires that the vice president and 'a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide' inform the Congress that the president is 'unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.' 

Former Attorney General Bill Barr has said 'orchestrating a mob to pressure Congress is inexcusable'

Former Attorney General Bill Barr has said 'orchestrating a mob to pressure Congress is inexcusable'

Game over: Mike Pence put the final seal on Joe Biden's election victory in the early hours of Thursday morning, declaring once and for all that Donald Trump had lost the election by a 306-232 margin in the electoral college

Game over: Mike Pence put the final seal on Joe Biden's election victory in the early hours of Thursday morning, declaring once and for all that Donald had lost the election by a 306-232 margin in the electoral college 

Rep. Andy Kim is seen cleaning up debris and personal belongings strewn across the floor of the Rotunda in the early morning hours of Thursday

Rep. Andy Kim is seen cleaning up debris and personal belongings strewn across the floor of the Rotunda in the early morning hours of Thursday

Sen. Tim Scott stops to look at damage in the early morning hours of Thursday after protesters stormed the Capitol on Wednesday

Sen. Tim Scott stops to look at damage in the early morning hours of Thursday after protesters stormed the Capitol on Wednesday

In another blow to , Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said will be blocked from both the Facebook and Instagram platforms at least through Inauguration Day, because the risks are 'too great.'

Several cabinet members serve on an 'acting' basis and have not been confirmed by the Senate, lowering the number from the threshold of 16 department heads who would take part in a 25th Amendment scenario. A post election purge took out the Defense secretary, and Attorney General Bill Barr.

Half the cabinet would have to vote, and Pence would then submit information to the Congress, making him acting president while other processes go forward.

Kinzinger for years has been an outlier in the GOP conference, bashing publicly and in cable TV interviews when he believes runs astray of democratic norms. But his public statement, made from his Capitol office in front of a U.S. flag, illustrates how quickly the possibility of action has jumped from fantasy to reality after Wednesday's stunning events in the Capitol.

The new talk of the 25th Amendment came as officials in the administration continued to resign and issued statements denouncing 's conduct.

Former White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney quit his diplomatic post in protest of the effort to 'overtake the government.'

'I can't do it,' said Mulvaney, who called Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, another former House Republican, to convey his views.

Mulvaney, a former House member from South Carolina who left Congress to join 's team, spoke out on CNBC hours after a pro- mob stormed the Capitol after being egged on to march there by President and his unsupported claims of mass election fraud.

'I called Mike Pompeo last night to let him know I was resigning from that. I can't do it. I can't stay,' he said, relinquishing his post as special U.S. envoy to Northern Ireland in the final weeks of the Administration.

He said he 'wouldn't be surprised' to see 'more of my friends resign over the next 24 to 48 hours.' Mulvaney served in the House with Pompeo.

'Those who choose to stay, and I have talked with some of them, are choosing to stay because they're worried the President might put someone worse,' he said – voicing an argument made by many top officials who lingered for months or years despite harboring doubts they later shared about 'I can't stay here. Not after yesterday,' he said – with a model of Air Force One and a presidential seal in the background behind him during a video interview.

Donald - pictured at the Wednesday rally near the White House where he whipped his supporters into a frenzy by repeating his false claims of election fraud - finally accepted his fate on Thursday morning and promised an 'orderly transition' on January 20, when Joe Biden will take office after being confirmed once and for all as the election winner 

Trump's statement was posted by an aide

Scavino posted the statement after Trump's account was locked

's grudging acknowledgement that Joe Biden will take office on January 20 was posted on Twitter by White House aide Dan Scavino, after the president's own account was locked for stirring up violence on Wednesday

Thousands of Donald Trump's most fervent supporters descended on Capitol Hill Wednesday to protest the results of the presidential election and obstruct Congress from certifying Joe Biden's victory

Thousands of Donald 's most fervent supporters descended on Capitol Hill Wednesday to protest the results of the presidential election and obstruct Congress from certifying Joe Biden's victory

Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf called the actions by supporters who rampaged through the Capitol 'sickening' – and publicly pleaded with President to condemn the violence.

'What transpired yesterday was tragic and sickening,' Wolf said in a statement Thursday.

'While I have consistently condemned political violence on both sides of the aisle, specifically violence directed at law enforcement, we now see some supporters of the President using violence as a means to achieve political ends. This is unacceptable. These violent actions are unconscionable, and I implore the President and all elected officials to strongly condemn the violence that took place yesterday,' Wolf said.

'DHS takes the safety and security of all Americans very seriously—it's at the core of our mission to defend our homeland. Any appearance of inciting violence by an elected official goes against who we are as Americans,' Wolf continued.

He said he would remain in his post 'to ensure the Department's focus remains on the serious threats facing our country and an orderly transition to President-elect Biden's DHS team.'  

Guns on the floor of the House: Capitol police point their firearms at a vandalized door during the hours-long carnage that erupted on Wednesday after Trump told his supporters to protest the election result

Guns on the floor of the House: Capitol police point their firearms at a vandalized door during the hours-long carnage that erupted on Wednesday after told his supporters to protest the election result 

Mockery: A Trump supporter puts his feet up on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's desk after storming into the Capitol during an unprecedented effort to subvert a democratic election and keep Donald Trump in power

Mockery: A supporter puts his feet up on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's desk after storming into the Capitol during an unprecedented effort to subvert a democratic election and keep Donald in power 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi's suite of offices were targeted by the rioters who smashed a mirror, cracked the Democrat's nameplate and left a menacing message scrawled on a file: 'WE WILL NOT BACK DOWN'

Speaker Nancy Pelosi's suite of offices were targeted by the rioters who smashed a mirror, cracked the Democrat's nameplate and left a menacing message scrawled on a file: 'WE WILL NOT BACK DOWN' 

Fire and fury: The flash of a police munition lights up the steps of the Capitol during the invasion by a Trump-incited mob

Fire and fury: The flash of a police munition lights up the steps of the Capitol during the invasion by a -incited mob 

A huge crowd of Trump supporters had turned up at the president's urging to protest the results of a fair democratic election

A huge crowd of supporters had turned up at the president's urging to protest the results of a fair democratic election

Donald finally accepted his fate just before 4am Thursday after Vice President Mike Pence ended his desperate campaign to overturn the election - still not properly conceding and instead boasting it was the 'end of the greatest first term in history' in a tweet from an aide's cellphone.

The VP brought the gavel down on the coup at 3:41 a.m. Thursday morning and certified President-elect Joe Biden's win – despite the attempt of scores of Republicans and a violent MAGA mob to overturn it. 

After Pence defied his boss to settle the 2020 election once and for all, finally said there would be an 'orderly transition' - a hallmark of American democracy he has repeatedly called into question - but still claimed falsely that the election was stolen despite all 50 states, a series of judges and now the U.S. Congress dismissing challenges to the result. 

Banned from twitter, the message was sent by Dan Scavino, his golf caddy-turned social media guru. 

'Even though I totally disagree with the outcome of the election, and the facts bear me out, nevertheless there will be an orderly transition on January 20,' said in a statement that aides posted on Twitter after the president's account was locked for stirring up violence. 

'I have always said we would continue our fight to ensure that only legal votes were counted,' said. 'While this represents the end of the greatest first term in presidential history, it's only the beginning of our fight to Make America Great Again.'  Pence made the final announcement after a nearly 15-hour saga that saw rioting supporters of President mob the U.S. Capitol Building in a day of carnage and shame that left four dead, saw pipe bombs, long guns and Molotov cocktails discovered in the Capitol grounds – and left America's image as the beacon of democracy reeling.   

In scenes which caused fear and anguish around the world, Trump's mob walked right through the corridors of Congress

In scenes which caused fear and anguish around the world, 's mob walked right through the corridors of Congress 

The mob walked right through the halls of Congress, ransacking offices and brazenly taking photos

The mob walked right through the halls of Congress, ransacking offices and brazenly taking photos 

Trump supporters attempt to ram their way through a police barricade as they raged at the president's election defeat

supporters attempt to ram their way through a police barricade as they raged at the president's election defeat 

Trump supporters marched through the Capitol Rotunda after breaching what appeared to be flimsy security - a stark contrast with the heavy-handed crackdowns that Trump ordered against Black Lives Matter protesters last summer

supporters marched through the Capitol Rotunda after breaching what appeared to be flimsy security - a stark contrast with the heavy-handed crackdowns that ordered against Black Lives Matter protesters last summer 

Morning after: A banner saying 'Treason' lies on the ground next to the dust strewn floor and some fire extinguishers

Morning after: A banner saying 'Treason' lies on the ground next to the dust strewn floor and some fire extinguishers 

Trash and Trump signs are seen piled beside the statue of Andrew Jackson - months after the president condemned the desecration of monuments to controversial figures in American history

Trash and signs are seen piled beside the statue of Andrew Jackson - months after the president condemned the desecration of monuments to controversial figures in American history 

A protester sits in the Senate Chamber, amid an invasion that forced Congress to suspend its joint session to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump

A protester sits in the Senate Chamber, amid an invasion that forced Congress to suspend its joint session to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald

The MAGA mob – which included white supremacists, Holocaust deniers and Q Anon followers - interrupted the certification of results as they smashed through police barricades, stormed into the halls of the Capitol and even sat in the Senate chamber.

They looted offices, vandalized statues and confronted police as they rampaged through the Capitol, carrying Confederate flags, in hours of anarchy which shocked the world and which Biden called an 'insurrection'. 

As the world watched in disbelief, many were shocked at how easily the invaders had breached the hallways of American democracy - contrasting the lax security with the heavy-handed crackdowns ordered by at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests last summer.  

Even as intruders desecrated the Capitol, was said to be reluctant to deploy the National Guard, with reports saying that he 'rebuffed and resisted' the request before Pence and others finally made it happen. 

Lawmakers were rushed off the floor of the House and Senate – and brought back at 8pm under armed guard while outside the mob defied a curfew in D.C. The president who had whipped them into fury tweeted: 'You are special. You are loved.'

One woman - 14-year Air Force veteran Ashli Babbit - was shot dead inside the building, with three others dead from unspecified 'medical emergencies' during the carnage. Washington police chief Robert Contee said 14 officers were injured, one of them pulled into a crowd and assaulted, while 52 people were arrested.  

Papers were strewn over the carpet of a parliamentarian's office

Furniture was flipped over during the violent invasion

Desecration: Papers were strewn over carpets and furniture was flipped over during the violent invasion of the U.S. Capitol

Supporters of Donald Trump stormed the Capitol on Wednesday amid questions over how they breached security so easily

Supporters of Donald stormed the Capitol on Wednesday amid questions over how they breached security so easily

A woman was shot in the chest on Wednesday afternoon after chaotic scenes broke out when dozens of Trump supporters breached security perimeters at the Capitol. She died at a hospital hours later, law enforcement sources said

A woman was shot in the chest on Wednesday afternoon after chaotic scenes broke out when dozens of supporters breached security perimeters at the Capitol. She died at a hospital hours later, law enforcement sources said

A man wearing a Trump hat is wrestled to the ground by security forces after the unprecedented Capitol security breach

A man wearing a hat is wrestled to the ground by security forces after the unprecedented Capitol security breach 

The siege brought an hours-long halt to what is usually the solemn democratic ritual of putting a final seal on the election result. When lawmakers eventually returned to their chambers, the Republicans trying to resist Biden's victory found that their numbers had dwindled, and all of their objections were voted down. 

The spectacle of a violent gang rampaging through the legislature trying to overturn an election result prompted outrage and anguish from America's fellow democracies, with Britain's Boris Johnson condemning the 'disgraceful scenes' and Germany's Angela Merkel saying she was 'furious and saddened' by the chaos. 

It was also seized on by America's authoritarian rivals to mock the state of US democracy, with Iran calling it 'fragile and vulnerable' and Russia saying that the election system 'does not meet modern democratic standards'. 

Former president Barack Obama described the riot as a 'moment of great dishonor and shame for our nation', while his predecessor George W. Bush said that 'this is how election results are disputed in a banana republic'. 

Congress' overwhelming rejection of attempts to overturn the vote and Pence's role in it will surely further enrage , who wanted his VP to unilaterally overrule Biden's win - and he was left further isolated by the resignation of multiple White House aides including former press secretary Stephanie Grisham. 

Deputy national security adviser Matt Pottinger, social secretary Rickie Niceta and deputy press secretary Sarah Matthews also quit, with more resignations expected from aides disgusted with 's conduct. 

The president was banished from Twitter for 12 hours Wednesday due to violating the company's rules meaning he could not vent on his favorite medium. The ban was due to expire at 5am Thursday morning, but there was no immediate word on whether 's access had been restored. 

Riot police prepare to move demonstrators away from the Capitol as authorities struggled to restore order on Wednesday

Riot police prepare to move demonstrators away from the Capitol as authorities struggled to restore order on Wednesday

The Republican bid to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's victory ended early Thursday morning after the Senate voted 92-7 to dismiss a challenge to Pennsylvania's Electoral College vote

Protesters broke windows to gain access to the Capitol as lawmakers were whisked to safety on Wednesday afternoon

Protesters broke windows to gain access to the Capitol as lawmakers were whisked to safety on Wednesday afternoon 

The protests escalated into violence as Trump supporters clashed with police on the grounds of the Capitol

The protests escalated into violence as supporters clashed with police on the grounds of the Capitol 

America's rivals gloat over Capitol chaos 

America's authoritarian rivals have delighted in the chaos at the Capitol, with Iran reveling in the 'fragility of Western democracy' and Venezuela mimicking the kind of criticism it usually receives from Washington.  

In a speech broadcast by state television, Rouhani said: 'What we saw in the United States yesterday evening and today shows above all how fragile and vulnerable Western democracy is.' 

In China, state-run tabloid Global Times crowed that 'bubbles of democracy and freedom have burst' in America. It also compared the chaos to the Hong Kong protests in 2019, mocking US politicians who had praised the demonstrations there.  

In Russia, foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said the 'archaic' US system was to blame for the rampage. 

'The electoral system in the United States is archaic, it does not meed modern democratic standards, creating opportunities for numerous violations, and the American media have become an instrument of political struggle,' Zakharova said.     

And in Veneuzela, parodying the kind of statements that usually come from Washington, authorities expressed 'concern' about the violence while calling for the US follow a path of 'stability' and 'social justice'.  

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Although still refuses to accept he lost the election, his early-morning statement was the first time he had fully acknowledged that he will be leaving the White House on January 20. 

The president has spent the last two months refusing to concede and lobbing baseless allegations of widespread voter fraud, even though his own Justice Department, federal courts and state governments have said repeatedly the vote was carried out freely and fairly.  

With just 13 days left of his presidency, is now at war with Mitch McConnell, facing whispers of his own cabinet trying to force him out and Democrats openly discussing impeaching him again - while just a handful of senators led by Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley and the majority of the House GOP remain loyal. 

It was Hawley who forced Congress to sit late into the night. Biden was at 244 of the 270 Electoral College votes needed when a final challenge of Pennsylvania's count pushed lawmakers back into their respective chambers.

In the Senate, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell skipped the two hours of permitted debate and went straight to a vote.

The upper chamber voted 92-7 to overrule the Republicans' objection - with some Republicans changing sides to vote with the majority after the carnage of the preceding hours. 

'We don't expect additional votes tonight,' McConnell said when things were done. McConnell had been against the GOP effort to challenge the Electoral College vote counts from the beginning.

The House proceeded with debate and then voted 282 to 138 to overrule the challenge of Pennsylvania, with 64 Republicans voting alongside Democrats to make up the majority.

Both houses have to vote in favor of a challenge for it to succeed.

Republicans in the House and Senate had earlier challenged the votes in Arizona - which prompted two hours of debate, interrupted by the MAGA riot - and that objection was overwhelmingly overruled.

House Republicans also tried to challenge the results in Georgia, Michigan and Nevada, but GOP senators would no longer sign on after the day's dramatic events. 

'Mr. President prior to the actions and events of today we did but following the events of today it appears that some senators have withdrawn their objection,' admitted Georgia Rep. Jody Hice when challenging the results in his state. 

A protester is seen hanging from the balcony in the Senate Chamber

A protester is seen hanging from the balcony in the Senate Chamber

Congressional staffers barricade themselves inside their offices as Trump supporters rampage through the Capitol Building

Congressional staffers barricade themselves inside their offices as supporters rampage through the Capitol Building

Damage is seen inside the US Capitol building early on Thursday as a Congressional staffer speaks on the phone beside statues of America's heroes

Damage is seen inside the US Capitol building early on Thursday as a Congressional staffer speaks on the phone beside statues of America's heroes 

The mob charged into the building, holding banners in support of the president who falsely claims the election was stolen

The mob charged into the building, holding banners in support of the president who falsely claims the election was stolen

A congressional member of staff (rear) holds his hands up as Police SWAT teams sweep the Capitol to clear it of rioters

Police wearing riot gear confronted the mob, but there were questions about how Trump's supporters managed to get inside

Police wearing riot gear confronted the mob, but there were questions about how 's supporters managed to get inside

Heavily-armed federal forces try to bring order in the hallways of American democracy after a violent mob barged in

Heavily-armed federal forces try to bring order in the hallways of American democracy after a violent mob barged in 

Trump's supporters had gathered to demand that the will of the American people be overturned by the House and Senate

's supporters had gathered to demand that the will of the American people be overturned by the House and Senate

Tear gas blows in the Capitol's Statuary Hall as invaders bearing Trump paraphernalia stormed the building on Wednesday

Tear gas blows in the Capitol's Statuary Hall as invaders bearing paraphernalia stormed the building on Wednesday 

The Confederate flag was flew in the hallways of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday after a Trump supporter brought it inside

The Confederate flag was flew in the hallways of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday after a supporter brought it inside

People wearing gas masks take shelter in the House gallery as protesters try to break into America's lower chamber

People wearing gas masks take shelter in the House gallery as protesters try to break into America's lower chamber 

The lawmakers were seen flanked by armed guards as they made their way into the Capitol

The lawmakers were seen flanked by armed guards as they made their way into the Capitol

The mob clashed with riot police after Trump told his supporters to travel to Washington and renewed his false fraud claims

The mob clashed with riot police after told his supporters to travel to Washington and renewed his false fraud claims

Supporters of Donald Trump gather in the Capitol Rotunda, shouting slogans as they try to overturn the election result

Supporters of Donald gather in the Capitol Rotunda, shouting slogans as they try to overturn the election result

taken off social media after praising rioters 

Twitter has suspended Donald 's account for 12 hours and for the first time deleted his tweets after he praised the mob who stormed Congress and said he 'loved' them.

YouTube and Facebook also followed suit in removing the posts, with Facebook and Instagram also blocking from their platform for 24 hours.

blocked him on Wednesday morning, before he filmed the video. The platform said their locking of his account was indefinite. 

In the deleted video, he poured more fuel on the fire, claiming the election was 'stolen' and telling the rioters that he 'loved' them.

Twitter said it had removed the tweets for violating their 'Civic Integrity policy'.

'As a result of the unprecedented and ongoing violent situation in Washington, D.C., we have required the removal of three @realDonaldTrump Tweets that were posted earlier today for repeated and severe violations of our Civic Integrity policy,' the social media company said.

'This means that the account of @realDonaldTrump will be locked for 12 hours following the removal of these Tweets. If the Tweets are not removed, the account will remain locked.'

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At nearly 4 a.m., Rep. Louie Gohmert tried to get one more challenge through - for the state of Wisconsin - but, again, a senator had withdrawn.

That spelled the end of the MAGA campaign to upend an election and Pence went on to read out the results of the Electoral College: Biden 306, 232.

But he managed to avoid saying 'Joe Biden is the winner' or similar words – a minor softening of the blow to by the deputy who had been until this week perhaps his most devoted follower.

'To those who wreaked havoc in our capitol today, you did not win,' Pence said after lawmakers returned to their seats. 'Violence never wins. Freedom wins. And this is still the people's house.'

The vice president, who chaired the special joint session as provided under the Constitution, called it a 'dark day in the history of the United States Capitol.'

'But thanks to the swift efforts of the U.S. Capitol Police, federal, state and local law enforcement, the violence was quelled. The Capitol is secured and the people's work continues,' Pence said.

But astonishingly – and to the disgust of Republicans including Mitt Romney and every Democrat – some Republicans continued their doomed bid to overturn the election result.

The most senior was House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who claimed that persisting was proof that Congress was not cowed by violence. And Josh Hawley, the Missouri senator who gave a clenched fist salute to the mob before it stormed the Capitol, also refused to back down even as other senators who had planned to object abandoned the campaign.

'Americans go to bed tonight their lasting memory should not be a congress overrun by rioters. It must be a resolute Congress, conducting healthy debate,' McCarthy said.

'We may not disagree on a lot in America but tonight, we must show the world that we will respectfully, but thoroughly carry out the most basic duties of democracy, we will continue with the task that we have been sent here to do. 

'We will follow the Constitution and the law and the process for hearing valid concerns about election integrity. We'll do it with respect.' 

A Trump supporter walks away with a bloodied nose after clashing with police near the Capitol Building in Washington DC

A supporter walks away with a bloodied nose after clashing with police near the Capitol Building in Washington DC

A Trump supporter wears a painted American flag Guy Fawkes mask amid chaotic scenes at the Capitol

A supporter wears a painted American flag Guy Fawkes mask amid chaotic scenes at the Capitol

A Trump supporter receives medical treatment after apparently being hit in the mouth with a rubber bullet during the riot

A supporter receives medical treatment after apparently being hit in the mouth with a rubber bullet during the riot

Trump supporters swarmed into the Capitol after the president made a fiery speech repeating his claims of a stolen election

supporters swarmed into the Capitol after the president made a fiery speech repeating his claims of a stolen election

A protester is pinned down by police outside the Capitol as demonstrators breached security and rampaged into the building

A protester is pinned down by police outside the Capitol as demonstrators breached security and rampaged into the building

The president's loyalists waved flags proclaiming a lost cause - the 2020 election, which was won by Joe Biden

The president's loyalists waved flags proclaiming a lost cause - the 2020 election, which was won by Joe Biden 

Sen. Josh Hawley, who was the first senator who pledged to back a House GOP effort to object to certain states' Electoral College vote counts, refused to abandon the effort entirely

Sen. Josh Hawley, who was the first senator who pledged to back a House GOP effort to object to certain states' Electoral College vote counts, refused to abandon the effort entirely

Sen Ted Cruz looks on as the certification proceedings continue despite objections by him and other Republicans

Sen Ted Cruz looks on as the certification proceedings continue despite objections by him and other Republicans

Sen. Hawley, who was the first senator who pledged to back a House GOP effort to object to certain states' Electoral College vote counts, refused to abandon the effort entirely. 

The Missouri Republican argued that the Senate floor was the appropriate place to address any election fraud concerns - as opposed to a violent riot.

Pence ordered National Guard to the Capitol after 'resisted' 

Mike Pence made the call to activate the National Guard after supporters ran wild in the Capitol Building, it has been revealed.

Acting Pentagon chief Christopher Miller revealed that he spoke to Pence and not , the Commander in Chief, before sending in the Guard to clear out rioters.

Maggie Haberman, the New York Times's White House correspondent, later revealed that had 'rebuffed and resisted' attempts to call in the guard before 'White House advisers' intervened to get the move approved. 

Meanwhile White House National Security Advisor Robert O'Brien praised Pence's courage for certifying the state election results - a typically routine task that was thrust under the spotlight after falsely suggested that Pence had the power to reject the result and declare him the victor.

'I just spoke with Vice President Pence. He is a genuinely fine and decent man. He exhibited courage today as he did at the Capitol on 9/11 as a Congressman. I am proud to serve with him,' wrote O'Brien. 

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'Violence is not how you achieve change,' Hawley said. 'And that's why I submit to my colleagues that what we're doing here tonight is actually very important. Because of those who have concerns about the integrity of our elections ... this is the appropriate means, this is the lawful place, where those objections and concerns should be heard.'

He said he hoped the Senate could address concerns 'peacefully, without violence, without attacks, without bullets.'

Hawley also used the Arizona debate to complain about Pennsylvania, correctly foreseeing that there would be no full debate about that state's results.   

'And so Mr. President let me just say now, that briefly, in lieu of speaking about it later, a word about Pennsylvania - this is a state that I have been focused on, objected to,' Hawley said.

He then went on to complain that the state set-up 'universal mail-in balloting.'

'And did it irregardless of what the Pennsylvania Constitution says,' Hawley said, using the improper word for regardless.

The senator then objected to how the Pennsylvania Supreme Court made its decision, holding up the law that allowed for enhanced mail-in voting during the coronavirus pandemic.

Directly after Hawley spoke, Sen. Mitt Romney applauded those senators, like Loeffler and Lankford, who had abandoned Hawley and the 'dirty dozen's' effort. 

'The best way we can show respect to the voters who are upset is by telling them the truth,' Romney implored.

And the truth, he said, was 'President-Elect Biden won the election. President lost.'

'I've had that experience myself, it's no fun,' Romney said, a reference to losing the 2012 presidential election to Democratic President Barack Obama.

As he concluded, Romney was given a standing ovation by some senators – but not by Hawley, who was sitting directly in front of him. 

McConnell, who earlier chastised members of his own party who planned to file objections to the Electoral College vote count, proclaimed, 'The United States Senate will not be intimidated.'

Pence's condemnation was followed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, with Schumer - a New York Democrat - placing the blame squarely on Trump

McConnell, who earlier chastised members of his own party who planned to file objections to the Electoral College vote count, proclaimed, 'The United States Senate will not be intimidated.' Pence's condemnation was followed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, with Schumer - a New York Democrat - placing the blame squarely on

An armed security agent tries to maintain order in the Capitol during what Joe Biden described as an 'insurrection'

An armed security agent tries to maintain order in the Capitol during what Joe Biden described as an 'insurrection' 

Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6

Pro- supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald on January 6

As 2 am neared, Rep Conor Lamb, a Pennsylvania Democrat who represents the Pittsburgh area, unloaded on the Republicans who objected to the vote from his state.

Lamb first read from the speech he had planned to give pre-riot, including that Allegheny County's vote-counting operation had '31 video cameras!' he said, raising his voice.

'These objections don't deserve an ounce of respect. Not an ounce,' he then said.

'A woman died out there tonight and you're making these objections,' Lamb went on. 'Let's be clear about what happened in this chamber today: invaders came in for the first time since the War of 1812.'

Lamb nodded over in the direction of a group of his Republican colleagues.

'We know that that attack today, it didn't materialize out of nowhere. It was inspired by lies, the same lies you're hearing in this room tonight, and the members who are repeating those lies should be ashamed of themselves,' Lamb said. 'Their constituents should be ashamed of them.'

Rep. Morgan Griffith shouted to have Lamb's comments struck from the record.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi gaveled his request down, later explaining that he wasn't quick enough, saying it needed to happen 'exactly when the words are spoken.'

Nearby, a scuffle among lawmakers nearly broke out involving Rep. Andy Harris, a Maryland Republican, and Rep. Colin Allred, a Texas Democrat, according to Capitol Hill reporters.

Allred is a former professional football player.

As 2 am neared, Rep Conor Lamb (pictured), a Pennsylvania Democrat who represents the Pittsburgh area, unloaded on the Republicans who objected to the vote from his state

As 2 am neared, Rep Conor Lamb (pictured), a Pennsylvania Democrat who represents the Pittsburgh area, unloaded on the Republicans who objected to the vote from his state

Speaker Nancy Pelosi reopened the House of Representatives Wednesday night with a vow to stay as long as it takes to certify the election and Joe Biden's victory.

'Congress has returned to the Capitol,' she said seven hours after the chamber was closed because rioters were trying to breach its doors. 'We always knew that this responsibility would take us into the night, and will stay as long as it takes. Our purpose will be accomplished. We must and we will show to the country.'

'We know that we're in difficult times, but little could we have imagined the assault, that was made on our democracy,' she said in reference to the pro- insurgents who tried to stop the Joint Session.

She said it was the duty of lawmakers to show the world 'the peaceful transfer of power from one president to the next.'

Shortly before all House members were evacuated around 2.30pm, Capitol Police approached Pelosi, who was presiding over the chamber from the speaker's rostrum, telling her she had to leave.

Pelosi didn't make a fuss and turned over her duties to House Rules Chairman Jim McGovern.

He told reporters on Capitol Hill that she whispered 'thank you' and handed him the gavel as she was led away.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., presides over the House Chamber after they reconvened

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., presides over the House Chamber after they reconvened

Some Republican senators backed down from the original plan to object after pro- insurgents rushed the Capitol.

But House Republican Leader McCarthy said it was lawmakers' duty to conduct 'healthy debate' and to hear 'valid concerns about election integrity.'

WHO'S STILL IN 'S CAMP? 

Josh Hawley 

Kevin McCarthy 

Ted Cruz 

Matt Gaetz

Louie Gohmert

Paul Gosar

Jim Jordan 

Ronny Jackson

Tommy Tuberville 

Marjorie Taylor Greene

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'When Americans go to bed tonight their lasting memory should not be a Congress overrun by rioters. It must be a resolute Congress, conducting healthy debate. We may not disagree on a lot in America but tonight, we must show the world that we will respectfully, but thoroughly carry out the most basic duties of democracy, we will continue with the task that we have been sent here to do. We will follow the Constitution and the law and the process for hearing valid concerns about election integrity. We'll do it with respect,' he said on the House floor after the chamber reopened.

But he also condemned the rioters.

'We saw the worst of America this afternoon,' he said.

McCarthy also warned lawmakers to think twice about what they post on social media. Posts by Republicans, including President , falsely stating the election was rigged and fraudulent were believed to have contributed to inciting the mob that ran sacked the Capitol.

'We also should think for a moment about what do we put on social media,' he said. 'Just because you have a personal opinion different than mine, you have a right to say it, but nobody has a right to become a mob. And we all should stand united to condemning them all together.'

Pence's condemnation was followed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, with Schumer - a New York Democrat - placing the blame squarely on .

'Today's events would certainly not have happened without him,' Schumer said. 

McConnell, who earlier chastised members of his own party who planned to file objections to the Electoral College vote count, proclaimed, 'The United States Senate will not be intimidated.'

'Will not be kept out of its chamber by thugs, mobs or threats. We will not bend for lawlessness or intimidation,' the Kentucky Republican said.

He said senators would discharge their Constitutional duty - to certify the results of the presidential race.

'And we're going to do it tonight,' McConnell said.

The Kentucky Republican proclaimed, 'Criminal behavior will never dominate the United States Congress.'

Schumer followed, admitting that he didn't quite have the words to describe what happened Wednesday on Capitol Hill.

'I have never lived through, or even imagined the experience like the one we have just witnessed in this Capitol,' he said. 'This temple to democracy was desecrated, its windows smashed, our offices vandalized.'

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., stops to look at damage in the early morning hours of Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021, after protesters stormed the Capitol in Washington, on Wednesday

Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., stops to look at damage in the early morning hours of Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021, after protesters stormed the Capitol in Washington, on Wednesday

Rep. Andy Kim, D-N.J., helps ATF police officers (special highly trained officers) clean up debris and personal belongings strewn across the floor of the Rotunda in the early morning hours of Thursday after protesters stormed the Capitol in Washington, DC, on Wednesday

Rep. Andy Kim, D-N.J., helps ATF police officers (special highly trained officers) clean up debris and personal belongings strewn across the floor of the Rotunda in the early morning hours of Thursday after protesters stormed the Capitol in Washington, DC, on Wednesday

Pro-Trump protesters gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC

Pro- protesters gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC

Lawmakers cower in fear as protesters try to break down the doors of the House Chamber on Wednesday

Lawmakers cower in fear as protesters

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