What you need to know about the coronavirus right now

(Reuters) - Here's what you need to know about the coronavirus right now:

Scientists say India government ignored warnings

A forum of scientific advisers, set up by the government, had warned Indian officials in early March of a new and more contagious variant of the coronavirus taking hold in the country, five scientists who are part of the forum told Reuters.

Despite the warning, the scientists said the federal government did not seek to impose major restrictions to stop the spread of the virus. Total cases in the country are now nearing 20 million, and the Indian COVID-19 variant has reached at least 17 countries including Britain, Switzerland and Iran, leading several governments to close their borders to people travelling from India.

Thailand reports new daily record of 31 coronavirus deaths

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Thailand on Monday reported a new daily record of 31 coronavirus deaths, the health ministry said, as the Southeast Asian country grapples with a third wave of infections.

The new outbreak, which includes the highly transmissible B.1.1.7 variant first detected in Britain, has accounted for more than half of total cases and deaths since the start of the pandemic.

'Hospitals are full' as Argentina cases hit 3 million

Coronavirus cases in Argentina hit 3 million on Sunday since the pandemic began, as medical workers said hospitals were full to capacity despite toughened government measures to bring down the spread of infections.

President Alberto Fernandez's government unveiled another round of tougher restrictions this week as a second wave of infections has battered the country, filling up intensive care units and setting new daily records for cases and deaths. But medical staff said it was still not enough.

English music-lovers party like it's 2019

Live music returned to the birthplace of The Beatles on Sunday after a long coronavirus-enforced silence when the English city of Liverpool hosted a one-off music festival to test whether such events spread the virus.

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Around 5,000 people ditched face coverings and social distancing rules in the name of science and music. They attended the outdoor event having tested negative for COVID-19, and promised to get themselves tested again five days after the festival. Their data will be used by the government's Events Research Programme to help understand the effect of crowds on the spread of the virus.

Aficionados return to Madrid bullring

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Carrying red and yellow flowers to show bullfighting is a symbol of Spanish culture, thousands of aficionados cheered on matadors who returned to Madrid's Las Ventas bullring on Sunday for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

A maximum of 6,000 people were allowed in to watch the bullfight - equivalent to 40% capacity at the arena, considered the world's most important bullring.

(Compiled by Karishma Singh, Editing by Sherry Jacob-Phillips)

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