Counties in Arizona state fleas tested positive for plague

Navajo County Public Health officials confirmed on Friday that fleas in the region tested positive for the Bubonic plague. It follows similar reports from Coconino County Public Health Services District in Arizona To reduce risk of exposure, officials have urged those living, working, camping or visiting the area to take precaution  Outbreaks occasionally occur in southwestern US states like Arizona during cooler summers following wet winters  Symptons of the Bubonic plague include sudden fever, headache, chills, and weakness and one or more swollen, tender and painful lymph nodes

By Matthew Wright For Dailymail.com

Published: 17:46 BST, 13 August 2017 | Updated: 17:46 BST, 13 August 2017

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Fleas in two Arizona counties tested positive for the plague, the same catastrophic Bubonic disease that killed millions, according to officials.

Navajo County Public Health officials confirmed on Friday that fleas in the region tested positive for the disease following similar reports from Coconino County Public Health Services District in Arizona.

Both are located in the northern part of the state.  

Navajo County Public Health officials confirmed on Friday that fleas in the region tested positive for the Bubonic plague. It follows similar reports from Coconino County Public Health Services District in Arizona

Navajo County Public Health officials confirmed on Friday that fleas in the region tested positive for the Bubonic plague. It follows similar reports from Coconino County Public Health Services District in Arizona

The Bubonic plague killed millions during the Middle Ages 

The Bubonic plague killed millions during the Middle Ages 

'Navajo County Health Department is urging the public to take precautions to reduce their risk of exposure to this serious disease, which can be present in fleas, rodents, rabbits and predators that feed upon these animals,' the public health warning states.

'The disease can be transmitted to humans and other animals by the bite of an infected flea or by direct contact with an infected animal.'

To reduce risk of exposure, officials have urged those living, working, camping or visiting the area to take precaution. 

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