Sudanese activist said trauma no excuse for African gangs

A Sudanese activist believes trauma that African gangs may have suffered is not an excuse for their violent actions.

Nelly Yoa, 28, hit back at an

she asked him if suffering in the war torn country was a reason for their actions. 

'That shouldn't be used as an excuse,' Mr Yoa, who fled war-torn South Sudan in 2003, said on Tuesday.

'Whatever you've gone through in your own country ... leave it there.' 

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A Sudanese activist believes trauma that African gangs may have suffered is not an excuse for their violent actions

A Sudanese activist believes trauma that African gangs may have suffered is not an excuse for their violent actions

Nelly Yoa, 28, (pictured) hit back at an ABC interviewer saying there's 'no excuse' for violence

Nelly Yoa, 28, (pictured) hit back at an ABC interviewer saying there's 'no excuse' for violence

The Sudanese athlete and youth worker told the ABC the crimes the African gangs are committing across Melbourne is 'appalling'

The Sudanese athlete and youth worker told the ABC the crimes the African gangs are committing across Melbourne is 'appalling'

The Sudanese athlete and youth worker told the ABC the crimes the African gangs are committing across Melbourne is 'appalling'. 

'A lot of them do use the excuse that they've come from a war torn country ... doesn't matter where you've come from,' Mr Yoa said. 

'The fact is, you're in this country, you need to abide by this country's law.' 

The footballer said the gangs, who have been tormenting Melbourne for years, are often bored, unemployed and aren't enrolled at school. 

The city has recently been hit with the so-called 'Menace to Society' gang along with the Apex gang.

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