North Dakota girl develops rare kidney disorder after she was infected with E. ...

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The parents of an eight-year-old girl say she is battling a rare kidney disease after swimming at a public pool.

Sadie Cameron, from Fargo, North Dakota, was having a fun day at the pool with her mother in July when, suddenly she started complaining that her stomach hurt and began vomiting.

She was rushed to see a doctor, who diagnosed her with an E. coli infection that she is believed to have contracted at the pool, reported Valley News Live.

Two days later, Sadie was only getting worse and was so hospitalized for dehydration.

It was then that doctors found that the infection had caused kidney damage, leaving Sadie dependent on dialysis and likely needing an organ transplant in the future.

Sadie Cameron, eight (pictured), from Fargo, North Dakota, was swimming at a public pool with her mother in July when she became sick

She visited a doctor who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection, which she likely contracted from the pool. Pictured: Sadie

Sadie Cameron, eight (left and right), from Fargo, North Dakota, was swimming at a public pool with her mother in July when she became sick. She visited a doctor who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection, which she likely contracted from the pool

Two days later, on July 19, Sadie was hospitalized at Sanford Medical Center in Fargo after she showed no signs of improving. Pictured: Sadie (left) with her sister Callie (center) and her mother Katie (right) during dialysis

Two days later, on July 19, Sadie was hospitalized at Sanford Medical Center in Fargo after she showed no signs of improving. Pictured: Sadie (left) with her sister Callie (center) and her mother Katie (right) during dialysis

After her first symptoms appeared, on July 17, Sadie was taken to see a doctor, who diagnosed her with a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection.

These infections come from E. coli (Escherichia coli), which are bacteria that generally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals.  

Most strains are harmless but a few produce a powerful toxin, called Shiga toxin, which damages the lining of the small intestine.

Infections occur when people come into contact with the feces of humans or animals or eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water.

Doctors told Sadie's parents that she had likely contracted E. coli while she was at the public swimming pool.

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