Do detergents cause childhood asthma? Cases of the disease rise 37% in 'extra ...

Do detergents cause childhood asthma? Cases of the disease rise 37% in ‘extra clean’ homes amid fears cleaners can damage babies’ airways Fears over link to child asthma from frequent household cleaning products use  Study suggests children have 37% higher risk of the illness in ‘extra clean’ homes More than one million children and five million people in Britain have asthma Experts are increasingly concerned about the dangers of indoor pollution 

By Ben Spencer Medical Correspondent For The Daily Mail

Published: 05:00 GMT, 17 February 2020 | Updated: 05:00 GMT, 17 February 2020

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Household cleaning products could be linked to childhood asthma, research published today suggests.

A study of 2,000 newborns found those whose parents most frequently used items such as dishwashing detergent, laundry products and surface cleaner were 37 per cent more likely to be diagnosed with asthma by the age of three.

It is thought cleaning chemicals may damage the lining of the airways in babies if they are very frequently exposed to the products. 

The team found that the quarter of children whose families had the highest frequent cleaning product use were the most likely to develop asthma. By three, these children were 37 per cent more likely to have a diagnosis of asthma and 35 per cent more likely to have a recurrent wheeze when compared with the quarter of families with the lowest cleaning product use

The team found that the quarter of children whose families had the highest frequent cleaning product use were the most likely to develop asthma. By three, these children were 37 per cent more likely to have a diagnosis of asthma and 35 per cent more likely to have a recurrent wheeze when compared with the quarter of families with the lowest cleaning product use

This could lead to an overactive inflammatory response in the respiratory tract.

More than five million people in Britain have asthma, including 1.1million children.

After years of warning about outdoor air pollution, caused by traffic and factory emissions, experts are increasingly concerned about the dangers of indoor pollution.

The problem of airborne chemicals – many from cleaning products – is exacerbated by modern energy-efficient, air-tight homes.

The latest research, led by Canadian scientists at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, involved 2,022 families.

Each family, whose babies were younger than

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