Daily 'smart thermometer' data shows Florida and Maine are seeing upticks in ...

As states across the US continue to see a decrease in fevers during the coronavirus pandemic, Florida and Maine are seeing upticks.

Kinsa Health, a medical technology company based in San Francisco, has been tracking daily fever readings using data from smart thermometers connected to the Internet.

According to one of Kinsa's maps, which tracks 'atypical' illnesses, most counties across the nation are colored yellow, orange or burnt orange to indicate low, mild or moderate rates of illness, respectively.

But Florida is the only state to have counties colored red, which indicates 'high' rates of atypical illnesses.

It comes on the heels of the state's Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, issuing an order for all residents to stay home after weeks of pushback.

In addition, on a map showing whether illnesses have been increasing or decreasing over the past week, almost every county indicates a decrease - except in Maine, where the majority of counties show an increase.

A map of daily temperature readings show high rates of flu-like illnesses in Florida compared to the rest of the US (above)

A map of daily temperature readings show high rates of flu-like illnesses in Florida compared to the rest of the US (above)

While fevers are decreasing in most parts of the country, they are increasing in Maine, which has some of the lowest overall coronavirus cases (above)

While fevers are decreasing in most parts of the country, they are increasing in Maine, which has some of the lowest overall coronavirus cases (above)

Most counties in most states have 'low', 'mild', or 'moderate' rates of illness, but Florida is the only state with counties colored red showing 'high' rates of flu-like illnesses. Pictured: Florida National Guardsmen walk past nurses gathering before the start of testing for COVID-19 at the Orange County Convention Center, in Orlando, April 1

Most counties in most states have 'low', 'mild', or 'moderate' rates of illness, but Florida is the only state with counties colored red showing 'high' rates of flu-like illnesses. Pictured: Florida National Guardsmen walk past nurses gathering before the start of testing for COVID-19 at the Orange County Convention Center, in Orlando, April 1

Kinsa has distributed more than one million thermometers and get about 162,000 temperature readings a day.

The thermometers upload the temperatures to a database (similar to Apple iCloud) and users can add other symptoms into an app.

Prior to using the tool to track COVID-19, Kinsa's tool has mostly been used to track where seasonal flu outbreaks are occurring.

Traditionally, the company's predictions have been two or three weeks ahead of those compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

With the coronavirus pandemic a new feature has been added to the map, which the company calls 'atypical' illnesses.

HOW DOES KINSA ANALYZE READINGS 

Kinsa has distributed one million smart thermometers from across the country

Users take their temperatures, which are then uploaded to a database

The company has received about 162,000 daily readings

People can then add other symptoms they are experiencing into an app

The app will offer advice on whether or not the person should consult their physician 

This tracks illnesses that don't match up with typical flu patterns and are likely due to the novel coronavirus.  

Influenza-like illness levels are depicted in orange and red and where they are expected to be depicted in blue.  

Most counties in most states have 'low', 'mild', or 'moderate'

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