'Fast ' is killing the planet - and British shoppers are the most ...

'Fast ' is slowly helping to kill the planet — and British shoppers are the most wasteful, a study has warned.

The clothes industry produces more than 92 million tonnes of waste a year and consumes around 1.5 trillion tonnes of water annually.

Furthermore, developing countries bear most of the brunt of this excess. 

In the UK, more garments are bought per person per year than anywhere else in Europe — to an astonishing 59 lbs worth in weight.

This is more than double the global average of 29 lbs — and almost twice as much as -conscious Italian consumers, who purchase an average of 32 lbs each. 

Germans, meanwhile — the second most wasteful — buy only 37 lbs per person.

Scroll down for video

'Fast fashion' is slowly helping to kill the planet — and British shoppers are the most wasteful, a study has warned. The clothes industry produces more than 92 million tonnes of waste a year and consumes around 1.5 trillion tonnes of water annually

'Fast ' is slowly helping to kill the planet — and British shoppers are the most wasteful, a study has warned. The clothes industry produces more than 92 million tonnes of waste a year and consumes around 1.5 trillion tonnes of water annually

'The average garment use-time has, consequently, decreased by 36 percent compared with 2005,' said paper author and design researcher Kirsi Niinimaki of the Aalto University in Finland.

'There is evidence in the UK, Norway and elsewhere suggesting disposal after little use, especially for impulse purchases.'

Fast is based on low-priced, trend-led products — and relies on 'recurring consumption'. This practice represents a 'key environmental threat', Professor Niinimaki said.

Constant turnovers in wardrobe contents has to stop — and be replaced by a new trend dubbed 'slow style', the researchers argued.

Shoes, , shirts, trousers and coats need to last for years — instead of months — to combat climate change, they added.

Shoppers will also have to pay more, with the 'environmental impact' of their purchases reflected in the prices, the team concluded.

According to Professor Niinimaki, consumers must start seeing clothing 'as more of a functional product rather than entertainment.'

'Slow is the future. But we need a new system-wide understanding of how to transition towards this model,' she added.

'It requires creativity and collaboration between designers and manufacturers, various stakeholders — and consumers.'

'Consumers also have a crucial role and must change their consumption habits.' 

'They must be ready to pay higher prices that account for the environmental impact of — namely decreasing clothing purchases and increasing garment lifetimes.'

Fashion is now the second largest industrial polluter after aviation, accounting for 10 per cent or more than 1.7 billion tons of global carbon dioxide emissions annually

is now the second largest industrial polluter after aviation, accounting for 10 per cent or more than 1.7 billion tons of global carbon dioxide emissions annually

is now the second largest industrial polluter after aviation, accounting for 10 per cent or more than 1.7 billion tons of global carbon dioxide emissions annually.

Furthermore, textile treatment and dyeing is responsible for a third of the

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

NEXT Residents of a remote island in Belize will use a machine to harvest drinking ...