4,500 year-old skeleton found in Germany in grave 'lovingly bordered with field ...

4,500 year-old skeleton found in German countryside grave 'lovingly bordered with field stones,' offering new insight on ancient burial practices Archeologists in the German countryside discovered a 4,500 year-old gravesite It contained the remains of a woman buried in a north facing fetal position The positioning is similar to that found in other sites across Europe, hinting at a possible shared practice that reached as far away as Scotland

By Michael Thomsen For Dailymail.com

Published: 17:49 BST, 22 May 2020 | Updated: 17:51 BST, 22 May 2020

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Researchers in Germany discovered the roughly 4,500 year-old remains of a woman buried in a simple but 'lovingly' made gravesite.

The discovery was made by Philipp Roskoschinski and a team of archeologists from the firm Archaeros while on a dig at Uckermark, a rural county around 60 miles northeast of Berlin.

Though the gravesite itself was humble, the posture and position of the woman indicate a possible connection with other ancient burial practices seen as far away as Scotland.

Researchers in Germany unearthed the remains of a woman believed to have lived around 4,500 years ago, buried on her side and facing north in a fetal position, similar the posture other ancient remains have been found in across Europe

Researchers in Germany unearthed the remains of a woman believed to have lived around 4,500 years ago, buried on her side and facing north in a fetal position, similar the posture other ancient remains have been found in across Europe

'I've never found anything like this,' Roskschinski said in an interview with Tagespeigel.

The remains were positioned in one of the oldest documented burial postures in Europe, rolled onto her right side and facing north, with her legs and arms bent into a kind of fetal position.

It's a similar position to another body found on the Scotish island of Tiree, which researchers believe was more than 5,000 years old, suggesting the practice may be a sign of some kind of shared practice that many disparate populations across Europe practiced.

There are still more questions than answers for the Uckermacker gravesite, and few clues about what sort of life the woman might have led, according to a report in Newsweek.

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