Scientists brew ancient beer with 'hints of blackcurrant and spices' from an ...

A beer trapped at the bottom of the sea for nearly two centuries is being recreated by Australian brewers.

Described as a port-house ale with 'hints of blackcurrant and spices', the ale plummeted to the sea floor during a shipwreck in 1797.

Scientists are now working to revive the 220-year old drink, described as the world's oldest surviving beer, using yeast found in the ageing bottles.

The ale has been named 'The Wreck - Preservation Ale', and will go on sale later this month.

Scroll down for video 

A beer trapped at the bottom of the sea for nearly two centuries has been recreated by Australian brewers. Divers exploring the ship wreck in the 90s (pictured) took the bottles of beer back to the mainland where they were stored at the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

A beer trapped at the bottom of the sea for nearly two centuries has been recreated by Australian brewers. Divers exploring the ship wreck in the 90s (pictured) took the bottles of beer back to the mainland where they were stored at the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

The yeast was found on a merchant ship called Sydney Cove, which was travelling from Calcutta to Port Jackson carrying tea, rice and tobacco, as well as 40,000 litres of alcohol.

It became shipwrecked at Preservation Island near Tasmania during a storm in 1797. 

Although the vast majority of the crew and the cargo were saved, some was lost in the wreckage.    

Divers exploring the wreck in the 90s took the bottles of beer back to the mainland and they have been stored at the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery in the Tasmanian city of Launceston ever since.

Three years ago, David Thurrowgood, a conservator at the museum and a former chemist, began the process of extracting the yeast from the beer. 

Fortunately, the icy cold conditions it resided in for 200 years preserved the yeast perfectly.  

'These bottles had ended up on a very cold, sandy ocean bottom and sat there undisturbed,' Mr Thurrowgood told The Australian.

The icy cold conditions the beer (pictured) resided in for 200 years preserved the yeast perfectly which allowed the scientists and brewers to recreate the beer. It is said to be a port-house ale with 'hints of blackcurrant and spices'

The icy cold conditions the beer (pictured) resided in for 200 years preserved the yeast perfectly which allowed the scientists and brewers to recreate the beer. It is said to be a port-house ale with 'hints of blackcurrant and spices'

HOW CAN YOU RECREATE A SHIPWRECK ALE? 

Australian brewers are attempting to revive a 220-year old beer, made from the yeast found in a shipwreck discovered more than two decades ago.

The first step was to identify whether any yeast was living and could be extracted.

Using DNA technology, the team confirmed that original samples of beer removed from bottles found on the seafloor off Tasmania contained a live -

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV 73% say they wouldn't trust a self-driving car
NEXT Technology Why the US is in a fight with Chinese phone maker ZTE, and why Trump wants to ...