JAN MOIR reviews Harry and Meghan: An African Journey

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By now, we all know the Harry and Meghan drill. Their royal mission in life is to 'shine a light' on hardship, to raise awareness and funds for good causes, while still being 'authentic' in themselves.

And truly, they are to be commended for this.

If they so wished, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex could slink behind the vegan silk curtains at Frogmore Cottage, they could hunker down on their Soho House velvet sofas and tell the world to go to hell, while raising baby Archie in the most private and pampered environment that only a century of British royal prerogative can provide.

However, they clearly have a sense of duty that precludes the luxury of such seclusion. Yet they want the best of both these worlds, which is where the trouble starts.

Harry & Meghan: An African Journey offered an insight into the emotional journey the 'vulnerable and bruised' royal couple have been catapulted into. Pictured: Meghan during the tour

Harry & Meghan: An African Journey offered an insight into the emotional journey the 'vulnerable and bruised' royal couple have been catapulted into. Pictured: Meghan during the tour

In an interview with ITV, The Duchess of Sussex said she has found the focus on her after her marriage and giving birth a struggle, adding: 'Not many people have asked if I'm ok'

In an interview with ITV, The Duchess of Sussex said she has found the focus on her after her marriage and giving birth a struggle, adding: 'Not many people have asked if I'm ok'

Harry & Meghan: An African Journey (ITV) told the story of their first official foreign tour, which took place in South Africa.

They hoped to focus on important humanitarian issues in a country still riven with gender and racial inequality, where dirt-poor black people remain trapped in townships and life expectancy rates are among the lowest in the world.

As the cameras started rolling, it was clear this could have been one of the most inspiring and amazing royal tours of all time, especially at the beginning when Meghan met young women in Nyanga township, the so-called 'murder capital' of the country.

'I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of colour and as your sister,' she informed the small crowd that had gathered. 

Her words might seem glib to first-world ears, but there is no telling how stirring they might seem to young women who could see and hear, through the Meghan prism, of a more hopeful future for themselves.

Meghan Markle was interviewed by Tom Bradby (pictured left) for the ITV documentary

Meghan Markle was interviewed by Tom Bradby (pictured left) for the ITV documentary

Later the duchess told documentary presenter Tom Bradby that she had added those words herself, with Harry's approval.

Bradby was given special access to the Sussexes for this hour-long documentary, and he reminded us more than once of the depth of his 20-year friendship with Prince Harry. 

The two men had often talked privately, we were informed, about grief and mental health issues. Yet did we really need to hear that Tom had a few issues of his own, and had to take time off work to deal with them last year?

Bradby clearly thought this gave him a special insight into the byzantine workings of the prince's mind, who – never mind the poverty and social blight he was witnessing – was soon voicing concerns about the media spotlight on himself and his wife. 

As the couple vented, Bradby crept around like a 17th century court flunkey, tugging his flaxen

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