Police are drafted in to guard shops to stop panic buying and enforce social ...

Police were drafted in to guard shops yesterday as queues again formed at stores around the country. 

The measures were thought to be aimed at countering panic buying and making sure shoppers kept the right distance from each other. 

Officers kept watch outside Lidl and Sainsbury’s stores at a shopping centre in Stratford, east London. 

They were also present at a Tesco in nearby Mile End as only one entrance was open to control who entered the store. 

The move came as supermarkets began to recruit pub bouncers and limit the number of shoppers allowed in. The measures are among a raft of initiatives they hope will put an end to ugly battles in the aisles. 

Panic buyers have been pushing and shoving as they battle to fill trolleys with items such as hand sanitiser, toilet roll and pasta. Tesco has recruited bouncers who lost their jobs as a result of the pubs shutdown. 

The supermarket giant yesterday joined other outlets in announcing measures to protect shoppers and staff, while maintaining access to groceries. 

Officers kept watch outside Lidl and Sainsbury¿s stores at a shopping centre in Stratford, east London

Officers kept watch outside Lidl and Sainsbury’s stores at a shopping centre in Stratford, east London

Shoppers at Sainsbury's superstore wearing face masks and gloves, at the store in Greenwich , south-east London on Wednesday

Shoppers at Sainsbury's superstore wearing face masks and gloves, at the store in Greenwich , south-east London on Wednesday

The measures include limits on the number of shoppers, marshals on the doors to police queues and floor markings in stores to aid social distancing at checkouts. 

Shoppers were pictured squeezing together at supermarkets up and down the country on Wednesday morning, ignoring social distancing rules from the government which say people are supposed to stay 6ft apart while stocking up on essentials and fanning fears that they could pass on the virus through touching and contaminating food. 

And Jeff Howes, 58, from Coventry, has now revealed that his mother caught the virus and died after shopping at her local Asda. 

Jean Howes, 87, only left her home for an hour a week to pick up groceries from Asda but while she was on one of her brief supermarket trips, the great-grandmother contracted the deadly bug and she died on Monday.

Her grieving son Jeff posted a poignant message on Facebook begging people to stay indoors in order to save lives.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday ordered Brits to stay at home to halt the spread of the virus, imposing curbs on everyday life without precedent in peacetime. 

However, people are still allowed to leave their homes to shop for basic necessities, leading to supermarkets being flooded with customers and fears that they will become hotbeds of the virus.  

Several major chains are now introducing new measures to try and enforce social distancing and protect staff, including a large quantity of hand sanitizer, gloves for workers and protective screens.  

In other coronavirus developments in the UK: 

London and Madrid are facing worse coronavirus outbreaks than Lombardy in with deaths doubling every two days Parliament is set to go into recess tonight a week early after pushing through a series of emergency coronavirus laws - with no return date; Sadiq Khan revealed it is inevitable he will have to cut Tube services even further because one in three staff are now off sick - despite mass overcrowding on the Underground;  NHS medics working across the UK fighting the coronavirus pandemic threatened  to 'quit the profession' over a lack of personal protection; Prisons could release some offenders to ease the pressure caused by coronavirus after jails in England and Wales were put on immediate lockdown last night; The UK's coronavirus death toll jumped to 422 in the biggest daily rise yet, while people still cram on the tubes and mingle in parks.

Shoppers in an East London Asda ignore social distancing rules as they stock up on essentials this morning

Shoppers in an East London Asda ignore social distancing rules as they stock up on essentials this morning

Despite having to stay 6ft apart, the shoppers crowded close together as they waited to get into the supermarket in Mile End

Despite having to stay 6ft apart, the shoppers crowded close together as they waited to get into the supermarket in Mile End

Great grandmother Jean Howes, 87, who only went out once a week to do her shopping at Asda, has died after contracting coronavirus

Jeff Howes, 58, from Coventry, revealed inn a social media post that his mother caught the virus and died after shopping at her local Asda

Great grandmother Jean Howes, 87, who only went out once a week to do her shopping at Asda, has died after contracting coronavirus, according to a social media post by her son Jeff

People queuing at Tesco on Bow Road by the Mile End flyover in London this morning, failing to heed social distancing rules

People queuing at Tesco on Bow Road by the Mile End flyover in London this morning, failing to heed social distancing rules

Heartbroken Jeff said: 'It is just madness that people are still going out in groups or having barbecues and carrying on with normal life.

'We were probably the same as everybody else thinking, this is a horrible thing but it won't affect us.

'If you are thinking like that, it can happen to you and when it does, it hits hard. I think there needs to be more of a clampdown and do what other countries have done them.

'I don't know how they would police it. It's difficult but it just needs to be stricter.'

The lorry driver and father-of-two started noticing his mum was suffering from cold-like symptoms last weekend.

He said: 'She would go out literally once a week for about an hour. She knew she was in the higher risk category so she was careful.

'I'd take her shopping just to the local Asda. She was independent but she stayed indoors as much as she could.

'I would drop her there, I wouldn't go around with her, she would do her shopping and I would do my shopping and meet her at the tills to take her home again.

'Mum was a good age, but she still had her independence until the end. The last time I took her shopping was a week last Sunday.

'She had a little bit of a cold. I said, 'do you want me to do your shopping for you?' But she wanted to go herself.

'Unfortunately, as the week went on, the symptoms got worse. It progressed quite slowly to start with, more or less just a cold. I was checking up on her obviously.

'She didn't seem to have the typical issues associated with the virus. She wasn't coughing, she thought her temperature was okay.

Police officers monitor the queues outside Tesco in Mile End, London this morning, as people cram together and ignore social distancing

Police officers monitor the queues outside Tesco in Mile End, London this morning, as people cram together and ignore social distancing

Shoppers at the Asda Greenhithe store queue up in the car park - with most appearing to be adhering to social distancing guidelines

Shoppers at the Asda Greenhithe store queue up in the car park - with most appearing to be adhering to social distancing guidelines

'It got a little bit worse during the week. You expect a cold to start off slow and then get a little bit worse but it didn't seem to be getting better.

'It wasn't until last Friday that things took a turn for the worst and Jean's symptoms escalated so much that she couldn't get out of bed.

'I went round at about 1.30 pm and all the curtains were shut. Obviously, that was a worrying sign. I could see that she was not very well.

'I called an ambulance, but even then, as far as I can see, she still wasn't showing the symptoms of the virus.

'She got that she started coughing a bit more, which rang alarm bells with me.

'Once they arrived they found she had a raging temperature, but even the crew thought it may have been a chest infection which would have given a high temperature anyway.

'Unfortunately, it turned out that she did have the virus. They took her into Coventry University Hospital.

'She then very quickly went downhill and died on Monday afternoon.'

Strict quarantine guidelines meant Jeff was not able to comfort his mother in hospital, often having to phone the ward she was on for regular updates.

He said: 'We were told we couldn't go and see her which is obviously the worst thing when a loved one is taken into hospital, that you can't go with them.

'I was just pacing up and down all day, wondering what's going on.

'You don't want to keep phoning them because, especially at certain times, as it's so busy there at the moment.

'At the end we were allowed to see her if we wore full protective suits which we did. It was heartbreaking.

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'I wouldn't want anyone to go through what we have gone through and that's why I'm begging people to stay at home and obey the rules on social distancing.'

Just hours after Jeff posted a poignant picture of his late mum on Facebook along with a warning to people to respect the rules it went viral.

So far more than 40,000 people have liked and shared his story from around the world.

He said: 'I can't believe how mad it's gone, it is just crazy. It's all over

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