Baseball writers vote to remove commissioner KM Landis's name from MVP awards

The Baseball Writers Association of America has voted to remove Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis's name from the Most Valuable Player awards after several former recipients complained about his role in the game's segregated past. 

According to an email sent to the BBWAA membership, 89 percent were in favor while 11 percent opposed removing Landis's name. In total, 313 votes were cast. 

Hired in 1920 as the sport's first commissioner to help clean up rampant gambling, Landis and his legacy are 'always a complicated story' that includes 'documented racism,' official MLB historian John Thorn said.

No African Americans played in the majors during Landis's quarter-century tenure. Jackie Robinson broke the barrier in April 1947, about 2 1/2 years after Landis died. 

The Baseball Writers Association of America has voted to remove Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis's name from the Most Valuable Player awards after several former recipients complained about his role in the game's segregated past

The Baseball Writers Association of America has voted to remove Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis's name from the Most Valuable Player awards after several former recipients complained about his role in the game's segregated past

In this file photo, a Joe DiMaggio 1947 MVP Award Plaque is displayed at a news conference in New York. The plaque features the name and image of Kenesaw Mountain Landis

In this file photo, a Joe DiMaggio 1947 MVP Award Plaque is displayed at a news conference in New York. The plaque features the name and image of Kenesaw Mountain Landis 

No African Americans played in the majors during Landis's quarter-century tenure. Jackie Robinson broke the barrier in April 1947, about 2 1/2 years after Landis died

No African Americans played in the majors during Landis's quarter-century tenure. Jackie Robinson broke the barrier in April 1947, about 2 1/2 years after Landis died

The BBWAA will vote in 2021 to consider adding another person's name to the respective National League and American League MVP plaques. 

'It will be determined in the future whether it will remain nameless or honor someone else,' tweeted USA Today's Bob Nightengale. 'I would love to see legendary HOF catcher Josh Gibson on the plaque.'

Gibson, one of the most celebrated players in the history of the Negro Leagues, died in 1947 at age 35 without ever getting the chance to play in the Major

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