Former Wallabies hardman Dan Palmer opens up about his battle with being a gay ...

Former Wallabies star Dan Palmer (pictured) has stepped out as one of Australia's first openly gay professional rugby players and shared how hiding his sexuality almost destroyed him

Former Wallabies star Dan Palmer (pictured) has stepped out as one of Australia's first openly gay professional rugby players and shared how hiding his sexuality almost destroyed him

Former Wallabies star Dan Palmer has stepped out as one of Australia's first openly gay professional rugby players and shared how hiding his sexuality almost destroyed him.

In 2012, the uncompromising front-rower was living the dream, having vice-captained the ACT Brumbies during the Super Rugby season, he was ready to make his debut with the Wallabies. 

The 23-year-old was at the top of the world, being paid to play the sport he loved and travelling the world with some of his best mates. 

But boiling away was a deep secret that almost drove him to suicide. 

In a groundbreaking article with the Sydney Morning Herald, Palmer admitted that his battle with his sexuality left him feeling 'incredibly frustrated, angry, and desperately sad'.

He said it was Israel Folau's homophobia scandal last year, which saw the star dramatically sacked by the code, that prompted him to finally speak out publicly.

The 23-year-old (centre) was at the top of the world, being paid to play the sport he loved and travelling the world with some of his best mates. But boiling away was a deep secret that almost drove him to suicide

The 23-year-old (centre) was at the top of the world, being paid to play the sport he loved and travelling the world with some of his best mates. But boiling away was a deep secret that almost drove him to suicide

The controversial rugby star had his contract torn up after posting on Instagram: 'Warning. Drunks, homosexuals, adulterers, liars, fornicators, thieves, atheists, idolaters. Hell awaits you. Repent! Only Jesus saves.'

Palmer, 32, slammed the former star for damaging the sport and causing a deep impact to kids who looked up to him. 

'He will never see the impact he has had on these young people, but if he could, I doubt he could live with himself,' he said.

At the height of his career Palmer said he would often cry himself to sleep because of the pain he was feeling. 

He admitted to dreaming about leaving it all behind to start a new life with a whole new identity. 

'It is not an

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