Peers push for to be granted speech at Parliament despite Bercow's ban

Donald could still be given the honour of a speech at Parliament when he visits Britain.

Peers are urging the Lord Speaker to defy a ban imposed by his Commons counterpart John Bercow on the US President addressing politicians, MailOnline can reveal.

Mr Bercow launched a tirade against Mr from the Speaker's chair last year - vowing to deny him permission to give a speech in Westminster Hall.

But while he was cheered to the rafters by Labour MPs as he condemned the president's immigration curbs on mainly-Muslim countries, the intervention drew fury from Tories who accused Mr Bercow of wading into international diplomacy and putting the Special Relationship at risk.

Peers are now pushing for the Lord Speaker, Lord Fowler, to step in and offer the use of the lavish Royal Gallery for Mr to deliver a speech - either during his working trip in July or on a future State Visit. 

Following months of wrangling, the White House finally confirmed last week that Mr Trump will visit the UK on July 13. A red-carpet State Visit is still being planned after that

Following months of wrangling, the White House finally confirmed last week that Mr will visit the UK on July 13. A red-carpet State Visit is still being planned after that

John Bercow launched a tirade against Mr Trump from the Speaker's chair last year (pictured) - vowing to deny him permission to give a speech in Westminster Hall 

John Bercow launched a tirade against Mr from the Speaker's chair last year (pictured) - vowing to deny him permission to give a speech in Westminster Hall 

Lords sources believe the Lord Speaker (pictured) could offer the use of the Royal Gallery without getting approval from Mr Bercow

Lords sources believe the Lord Speaker (pictured) could offer the use of the Royal Gallery without getting approval from Mr Bercow

They believe Lord Fowler is 'receptive' to the idea after he sharply criticised Mr Bercow for declaring a unilateral ban and said he was 'open minded' on whether the honour should be granted.

Lords sources believe the Lord Speaker could offer the use of the Royal Gallery without getting approval from Mr Bercow.

Who decides whether foreign leaders can speak at Parliament?

The rules on speeches by foreign dignitaries at Parliament are dictated by conventions and traditions that have developed over hundreds of years. 

The use of Westminster Hall is closely guarded by three powerful keyholders.

The ancient hall - the oldest part of the Parliamentary estate that dates back around 1,000 years - has played a pivotal role in UK history.

It is protected by the Speakers of the Commons and Lords and the Great Lord Chamberlain, on behalf of the Queen.

Currently they are John Bercow for the Commons, Lord Fowler for the Lords and David Cholmondeley, 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley.

Speeches in the hall are rare. US President Barack Obama, South African President Nelson Mandela and Burmese leader Aung San Suu Kyi are among the select few.

Events cannot take place without the agreement of the key holders.

However, the Lord Speaker does appear to have scope to authorise use of the Royal Gallery without Mr Bercow's agreement.

That opulent venue is under the control of the Upper House, and has been used to host numerous speeches - including by Ronald Reagan in 1982 and Xi Jinping of China last year.  

Mr Bercow previously referred to a 'convention' that invitations are issued jointly by the Speakers - but conceded that he does not have the final word when it comes to the Lords estate.

Support for bypassing the Commons Speaker could be fuelled by growing anger at his handling of allegations about bullying of staff.

The Royal Gallery has been used as the venue for numerous speeches by visiting foreign leaders in the past. Ronald Reagan addressed MPs and peers there in 1982, and last year it hosted President Xi Jinping of China. 

Following months of wrangling, the White House finally confirmed last week that Mr will visit the UK on July 13.

He is expected to hold talks with Theresa May and potentially meet the Queen - although the details are still being hammered out.

Critics who accuse him of fuelling sexism and racist rhetoric have promised to stage mass demonstrations on the streets of London. 

But ministers have insisted it is right that the leader of Britain's closest ally visits and is treated with respect.

Boris Johnson praised the announcement of the trip as 'fantastic news'.

Mrs May was among the first foreign leaders to Mr in the White House in January last year, when she extended an invite for a red-carpet State Visit.

However, planning stalled amid fears over mass protests, and the president pulled out of a working visit in February to open the new US embassy in London.

He also earned a public rebuke from the Prime Minister after sharing anti-Muslim tweets from far-Right group Britain First.

US ambassador Woody Johnson insisted last week that the State Visit will happen. 

Former Cabinet minister Lord Tebbit told MailOnline he would like to see the Lord Speaker offer to

read more from dailymail.....

Get the latest news delivered to your inbox

Follow us on social media networks

PREV Homeowner wins battle over neighbour's 'jungle' 50ft hedges
NEXT 'You brought death to yourselves': ISIS fanatics warn of random attacks in ...