Millions of employees overpaying tax due to wrong tax code - how to check yours ...

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Approximately 14.3 million people (44 per cent of employees) across the UK have paid too much tax as a result of being on the wrong tax code, or through errors with deductions, according to new research. What’s more, seven per cent of employees (2.8 million) claim to have been affected in the past year alone. The research of more than 2,000 people in the UK also suggests there is confusion when it comes to payslips. The figures suggest that 69 per cent of employees (22.4 million) believe that it’s not their responsibility to check they’re paying the correct amount of tax.

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Taxes are complex and the research shows that significant overpaying of tax is caused by payroll issues, such as being on the wrong tax code, or errors with deductions such as childcare vouchers

Shaun Shirazian, Head of Product at Intuit QuickBooks UK

Furthermore, 60 per cent of employees (13 million) don’t realise having multiple jobs can affect Income Tax.

Almost a quarter (23 per cent) of all employees have four or more regular deductions from their gross pay, such as travel loans, childcare vouchers, student loans, gym memberships, and medical insurance, which may affect on’s tax code.

Shaun Shirazian, Head of Product at Intuit QuickBooks UK, who conducted the research said: “Many of us can feel a bit lost when checking our payslips and feel unsure about the multiple factors that contribute to our adjusted pay.

“Taxes are complex and the research shows that significant overpaying of tax is caused by payroll issues, such as being on the wrong tax code, or errors with

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