The SCANDALOUS reason Sarah Ferguson and Prince Andrew divorced - is it what ...

Sarah Ferguson, 58, married Prince Andrew, 58, in a very romantic, highly publicised in 1986.

The pair had a whirlwind romance, with Andrew proposing to Sarah after just a short time dating.

It seemed like a match made in heaven, with the two having been in each other’s lives for a long time.

The couple met back when they were children, with Fergie revealing in her autobiography that she would sneak away from her father’s polo matches to "play tag with like-minded truants – including Prince Andrew, who was just my age”.

After falling out of touch, Sarah and Andrew where then reintroduced by Princess Diana, when she invited Sarah to a party at Windsor Castle.

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The couple began dating and announced their engagement shortly after, going on to be married for 10 years.

It is reported that the couple’s marriage problems started in 1991, just one year after the birth of their second daughter, Princess Eugenie, 28.

Prince Andrew had a successful navy career going, meaning the two would go for months without seeing each other, reportedly 40 days a year in the first five years of their marriage.

In 1992 the Palace announced Fergie and Andrew’s separation, issuing a statement reading: “…Last week, lawyers acting for the Duchess of York initiated discussions about a formal separation for the Duke and Duchess.

“These discussions are not yet completed and nothing will be said until they are. The Queen hopes that the media will spare the Duke and Duchess of York and their

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