Gran, 61, who gave birth to son's baby says it was 'no different' to when she ...

A grandmother who gave birth to her granddaughter in her sixties claimed it was 'no different' to when she had her own children 30 years ago - and admitted she's been surprised by the publicity it's generated as she didn't think it was 'that big a deal'. 

Kind-hearted mother Cecile Eledge, 61, agreed to be a surrogate for her son Matthew, 32, and his husband Elliot Dougherty, 29, who were considering IVF to start a family after they wed in 2015.

Elliot's sister Lea Yribe, 26, offered to donate her eggs and then Cecile suggested she carried the baby. 

Despite having last given birth more than three decades ago - and going through the menopause 10 years ago - Cecile assured the couple that she 'loved being pregnant', and would 'do it again in a heartbeat'. 

Kind Cecile Eledge, 61, (pictured centre) offered to be a surrogate for her son Matthew, 32, (left) and his husband Elliot Dougherty, 29, (right) and gave birth to baby Uma (right) in March

Kind Cecile Eledge, 61, (pictured centre) offered to be a surrogate for her son Matthew, 32, (left) and his husband Elliot Dougherty, 29, (right) and gave birth to baby Uma (right) in March

After going through a series of medical tests, doctors deemed Cecile had the 'body of a 40-year-old' and she remarkably fell pregnant on the first attempt.

On March 25, Cecile gave birth naturally to Uma Louise Dougherty-Eledge at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, weighing five pounds and 13 ounces.  

Appearing on Good Morning Britain today, Cecile told hosts Kate Garroway and Richard Madeley her pregnancy wasn't much different to what she'd experienced in the past.

'The morning sickness was more intense,' she admitted. 'It was funny because when I went to the doctor's at the end they said, "Have you been having any contractions?" and I'm like, "I don’t think so," but when we were in labour having the heavy contractions, I looked at my husband and was like, "Now I remember this!"

'Once we had Uma and I had my granddaughter, I was not expecting so much publicity; to be truthful I didn't think it was that big of a deal - any mom would do this.' 

After going through a series of medical tests, doctors deemed Cecile had the 'body of a 40-year-old' and she fell pregnant on the first attempt

After going through a series of medical tests, doctors deemed Cecile had the 'body of a 40-year-old' and she fell pregnant on the first attempt

Elliot's sister Lea Yribe, 26, offered to donate her eggs, which were fertilised using Matthew's sperm, and then Cecile carried the baby

Elliot's sister Lea Yribe, 26, offered to donate her eggs, which were fertilised using Matthew's sperm, and then Cecile carried the baby

Asked whether she worried about being able to 'hand over' the child once she was born, Cecile said she never deterred from the feeling that this was her grandchild, not her daughter.

'I was at the stage in my life when I no longer wanted children,' she explained.

'One of the coolest moments was, I was holding my other grandchild when I was four or five months pregnant, and it was the first time I felt Uma kick, and I thought, wow, not many grandparents can say, "I'm holding my grandchild here on earth and I have my other grandchild in my womb". 

'That was just a cool memory and a moment I got to have that not a lot of people get to cherish.'

The trio revealed that Cecile offered to carry Matthew and Elliot's baby over a family dinner one evening - and the couple thought she was joking.

Matthew recalled: 'We're from Nebraska, so for a queer couple, adoption and foster care were a little bit of a path we weren't quite ready to navigate, so we decided we wanted to go for IVF.

Asked whether she worried about being able to 'hand over' the child once she was born, Cecile said she never deterred from the feeling that this was her grandchild, not her daughter

Asked whether she worried about being able to 'hand over' the

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