BBC resorts to asking viewers to monitor the light around their TVs after ...

The BBC has resorted to asking viewers to monitor the light around their TVs after  complaints that hit shows like The Luminaries and Wolf Hall are too gloomy.

As part of a study, the broadcaster will question participants about the layout of their windows, sofa and screen in a bid to create the best lighting conditions.

It follows armchair critics being left frustrated by dimly lit scenes in the BBC drama The Luminaries, with the director of Wolf Hall also defending the lighting in the show as ‘lovely and atmospheric’ after viewers claimed it was ‘too dark’.

Director Peter Kosminksy previously used special low-light cameras to capture the action in BBC's Wolfhall, above, and hit back at critics claiming the lighting was too dim

Director Peter Kosminksy previously used special low-light cameras to capture the action in BBC's Wolfhall, above, and hit back at critics claiming the lighting was too dim

The new project could lead to the development of smart sets that can adjust to the brightness of a room, alongside menus to optimise different quantities of light.

BBC Research & Development executive Phil Layton, who is running the study, told The Times: 'Some dramas are dark because that's the feel that the director of photography wanted to create.

'We are not trying to lose that, we are trying to preserve the artistic intent. But we are trying to make sure that viewers understand how best to view that content.'

BBC R&D's Alana Boles said the project's findings so far show brightness levels vary at different times throughout the day.

She added: 'TV screens and tablets will potentially need to be able to adapt to variations in viewing lighting to give audiences the best viewer experience as possible.'

Director Peter Kosminksy previously used special low-light cameras to capture the action in BBC's Wolfhall, and author Hilary Mantel, who has praised the adaptation,  said that the candlelight helped put actors into the 'Tudor frame of mind'.  

Mr Kosminksy hit back at critics claiming the lighting was too dim, by arguing that it could equally be viewed as ‘lovely and atmospheric’. 

He added: 'They are legitimate concerns to have but the camera we were using is amazing.

Armchair critics were left frustrated by dimly lit scenes in the BBC drama The Luminaries, above, with one Twitter user posting it was 'too dark to see what's going on'

Armchair critics were left frustrated by dimly lit scenes in the BBC drama The Luminaries, above, with one Twitter user posting it was 'too dark to see what's going on'

The dramatic beach scene in which Anna (Eve Hewson) accuses Lydia (Eva Green) of killing her husband was impacted by the poor lighting which blighted the BBC1 series

The dramatic beach scene in which Anna (Eve Hewson) accuses Lydia (Eva Green) of killing her husband was impacted by the poor lighting which blighted the BBC1 series 

Viewers were frustrated by the lighting in the show, saying it is 'so dimly lit' that it is difficult to make out characters' faces. Pictured: Eva Green (left) and Eve Hewson

Viewers were frustrated by the lighting in the show, saying it is 'so dimly lit' that it is difficult to make out characters' faces. Pictured: Eva Green (left) and Eve Hewson

‘I don't like the type of filmmaking where people have to shut off all the lights to be able to see what is on the screen properly. I would never present something to an audience that was dim or gloomy or difficult to see.

‘Of course the night scenes are quite moody but only in the sense that any drama's night scenes will be quite moody compared to a daylight scene. It would be completely stupid to give something to audiences that they weren't able to see.'

Meanwhile, Twitter users reacted to the lighting in The Luminaries last month, with one tweeting: 'Ironic it's called #TheLuminaries when you can see b****r all because it's always dark.'

Another added: 'I was going to watch #TheLuminaries tonight but then my husband offered to lock me in the dark in the downstairs loo and mumble unintelligibly through the keyhole... so I chose that instead.'

Social media users reacted to the lighting in the BBC's The Luminaries, with one tweeting: 'Ironic it's called #TheLuminaries when you can see b****r all because it's always dark'

Social media users reacted to the lighting in the BBC's The Luminaries, with one tweeting: 'Ironic it's called #TheLuminaries when you can see b****r all because it's always dark'

A third wrote: '#TheLuminaries on could do with some illumination, it’s too dark to see what's going on.'

Viewers also previously complained over characters 'mumbling' on screen in the show, making it difficult to hear the dialogue.

It comes after the BBC trialled

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